‘Alaskan Bush People’: Watch Ami Brown Give Moving Message to Family After Billy’s Death in Next Episode Preview

by Matthew Memrick
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Ami Brown’s inspiring words seemed to move her family after her late husband’s death in a preview for the next “Alaskan Bush People” episode. 

The family matriarch gathered her family and gave them a little pep talk about fulfilling her late husband’s dream of having a successful ranch. Ami’s daughters are Rain and Snowbird, while her sons are Bear, Matt, Bam Bam, Gabe, and Noah.

“Sad as it may be, da’s not right here with us, not physically, but we know in spirit he is,” the 58-year-old woman said in the new two-minute clip. “And we know what all da wanted — we have to go on, that’s what we do.” 

People Magazine reported on the woman’s grief, but also shared her hope. The pep talks emboldens her children, telling them we “have to be strong and continue with life.” She adds that her late husband would have wanted the ranch to continue. She pumps them up, saying they could make it an even better operation.

The “Alaskan Bush People” family responded with bright ideas, and one even talked about looking for gold on the Washington state property called North Star Ranch.

Billy Brown, 68, died from a seizure on Feb. 7. 

The Little House On The Prairie Plan

Ami Brown’s talk inspired the “Alaskan Bush People” troops, and the woman wants a livestock barn. That could be a problem in the winter, but the old pioneers found a way back in the day, right?

Bear Brown wonders how this could happen with all the snow, but Ami’s got all the answers.

The mother suggests burning the land to melt the snow while adding Noah’s tractor could help the effort. She even says she’ll roll up her sleeves and shovel.

Bam Bam Brown interjects that they’ll need space for their horses to get the ranch ready for the animals. 

The 38-year-old exudes his passion for the “Alaskan Bush People” project, saying with hard work and desire they can make it work. He is excited about the plan and tells the family they can succeed by following it.

Hey, you can see this family has the drive. Could you imagine how the city folk would respond? The loud mehs would be deafening. 

Gold Rush At The Ranch?

Eighteen-year-old Rain speaks up late in the conversation, relating that her late father talked about finding gold on the mountain.

She seemed enticed by the prospect of prospecting.

Ami responded to the young woman by saying, “of course,” and the thoughts of gold fluttered into the young woman’s head.

The clip ends with Ami Brown’s metaphysical fist-pumping words where she says it’s just the closing and end of the era “and the beginning of another.” 

You have to wonder how much of the “Alaskan Bush People” show will go with that plotline.

“Alaskan Bush People” is set for Sunday nights (8 p.m. ET) on Discovery and discovery+.

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