‘Chicago Fire’: Is Steven R. McQueen’s Jimmy Borrelli Going To Return?

by Joe Rutland
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One of the most popular Chicago Fire characters was firefighter Jimmy Borrelli, played by Steven R. McQueen. Is he returning?

Outsiders, we turn to an article from One Chicago Center for some help. The short, quick answer is to not expect it.

If you don’t recall, then let’s catch you up on Borrelli.

He was a part of Firehouse 51. Borrelli was a young firefighter candidate who made quite a lasting first impression with his debut in Season 4’s premiere.

Borrelli shows a lot of promise. Things go downhill when brother Danny, played by Andy Ahrens, also a firefighter, was killed on the job. It sent Jimmy into a tailspin and he blamed Boden, played by Eammon Walker, who was acting chief in charge at the scene.

‘Chicago Fire’ Character Ignored Chief’s Order, Pays Price With Serious Burns

It got so bad on Chicago Fire that Jimmy just ignored an order from Chief Boden.

So, in Season 5’s second episode, titled A Real Wake-Up Call, the firefighters respond to a multi-vehicle car accident. Boden finds out one car involved is a truck carrying petrol. It was a timebomb that would explode at any moment.

Boden told Jimmy to stand down in helping a victim. But Jimmy ignores the order and reaches the vehicle as it explodes.

Borrelli suffers severe burns to the left side of his face. Afterward, he goes to Chicago Med for treatment. Doctors do save his life. He loses his left eye. It ends Borrelli’s firefighting career.

Chicago Fire showrunners or executive producers have not said a word about McQueen showing up.

Catch a new episode this Wednesday at 9 p.m. Eastern, 8 p.m. Central, on NBC.

Why Did Otis Get Killed Off The Show? Answers Have Been Provided

Otis Zvonecek gets killed off by Chicago Fire writers in the Season 8 opener.

Why? Executive producer Derek Haas clears up the confusion in an interview. Yuriy Sardarov plays the role.

Back in 2019, he talked with TV Insider and Haas explained they believed that the audience needed a reminder about the nature of firemen’s work. Haas says the show was straying away from having firefighters’ work become the major focus.

He said that Chicago Fire finished Season 7 without knowing what they were going to do.

Haas also says the show “had pulled the football too many times when a person was in danger, then was saved.”

He says that the audience “has to be reminded that these calls are dangerous and sometimes people don’t make it.

“We thought, what if we killed off Otis and he dies heroically? We realized there was so much emotional landscape we could cover.”

Outsider.com