‘Deadliest Catch’ Captain Sig Hansen Speaks on Show’s Popularity Among Veterans

by Joe Rutland
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When it comes to who’s watching “Deadliest Catch,” Captain Sig Hansen is quite pleased veterans are among those viewers.

Hansen, who also is an adviser on the TV show, talked about this in an interview with We Are The Mighty.

“When [WATM] said we have a lot of veteran viewers, it didn’t surprise me,” Hansen said. “We’ve received so many emails and information coming back to us from [active duty] troops. We can’t tell you how many people in the military would give praise to the show.

“There is a common denominator, maybe it is from them being gone and us being gone at sea,” Hansen, who also has his daughter Mandy out there as a captain, said. “No matter what it was, they appreciate us. Shared experiences. It’s mind-boggling. It is really flattering.”

The “Deadliest Catch” star said he and other captains appreciate the veterans for what they do and being part of the audience.

“I think we’re very much alike,” Hansen said. “There is risk and reward across the board and that’s a common denominator. We appreciate them as much as they appreciate us. It feels like family and it’s [a] really neat thing to see that.”

“Deadliest Catch” is in its 17th season on the Discovery Channel. Hansen, both father and daughter, are among the captains on the show. Other captains include Josh Harris, Casey McManus, Jake Anderson, Johnathan Hillstrand, and Keith and Monte Colburn.

Shows find these captains out in the Bering Sea during Alaskan king crab and snow crab seasons. Why is it called “Deadliest Catch”? Because of the number of events happening that can be seen as life-threatening ones.

Deckhand on ‘Deadliest Catch’ Faced Hard Choice After Getting Injured

Deckhands find themselves facing hard choices on “Deadliest Catch.” This is especially true if you are injured.

So, Eddie Hillstrand suffered a separated shoulder. He is part of his uncle’s fishing boat called “Time Bandit.”

He had that injury, but the family dynamics didn’t really make things much easier for Hillstrand.

As a deckhand, Eddie knows it is serious business. One boat can earn nearly one million dollars on any given outing. This means everyone needs to be both focused and committed.

These jobs are very hard to get.

Now Johnathan Hillstrand also had to deal with another “Time Bandit” crew member suffering an apparent groin injury. That man wanted to be on the deck but had to go.

Hillstrand found that news hard to take. He told Eddie that he could keep the shoulder in a sling the entire time, starting his recovery on the boat. Eddie, though, already was set to go home.

Outsider.com