Meghan McCain Opens Up About Dark Times Surrounding Her ‘Silent Miscarriage’

by Samantha Whidden
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Nearly three years after suffering from a silent miscarriage, former The View co-host Meghan McCain opens up about the dark times surrounding the devastating experience.

During a recent interview with People’s Me Becoming Mom podcast, Meghan McCain revealed more details about her silent miscarriage. “I had morning sickness and I wasn’t feeling well. And then the symptoms started to fade a little bit.”

Meghan McCain went on to recall that she wasn’t concerned at the time because she didn’t know it was a bad sign. However, a few days later, blood work revealed that her pregnancy wasn’t progressing normally. “I was so confused. I think of having a miscarriage as, like, you start bleeding profusely in the middle of a room. And mine was very different.”

Meanwhile, Meghan McCain was dealing with the loss privately while also trying to juggle her busy career. “It was one of the darkest times of my life. It’s like every sense in my body was overwhelmed, and then I was heartbroken.”

Meghan McCain further revealed that her friends, as well as her makeup and hair person, knew about the miscarriage. “I went to the doctor and they were in my apartment. And they had hid the baby books that I had bought. They hid them out of the way ‘cause they knew I was having a miscarriage. Because I told them and it was just so sad.”

More than a year after the pregnancy loss, Meghan McCain and her husband, Ben Domenech, welcomed their first baby together, Liberty Sage. 

Meghan McCain First Revealed Details About the Miscarriage in Her July 2019 New York Times Op-Ed 

Meghan McCain first went public about her silent miscarriage in her July 2019 New York Times op-ed. She described the miscarriage as a “horrendous experience” and that she wouldn’t wish it on anyone.

“Yet for all its horrors, it is distressingly common,” former The View co-host penned. “Estimates range from one in 10 to one in four pregnancies end in miscarriages. That’s about three million lost children in America each year. That is all the more reason women need to be able to speak about this publicly, without the stigma and the lack of knowledge that pervades the issue.”

Meghan McCain further explained that despite how common miscarriage is, the subject often carries so much cultural taboo. “Miscarriage is a pain too often unacknowledged. Yet it is real, and what we have lost is real. We feel sorrow and we weep because our babies were real.”

Following the loss, Meghan McCain stated that she has asked the same question every mother asks who loves and loses a child: Why? “Why was this light and joy held before us, and then the world where this child drew breath cast into shadow? Why was an innocent life created in the image of God and then abruptly snuffed out?”

Outsider.com