‘NCIS: Los Angeles’ Star LL Cool J Shares Amazing Tribute To Biz Markie from the Emmys

by Joe Rutland
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What a way for Sunday night’s Emmy Awards to begin as “NCIS: Los Angeles” star LL Cool J shared quite a tribute to Biz Markie.

LL Cool J, who is an epic rapper in his own right, joined Emmy Awards host Cedric the Entertainer and other stars in singing Markie’s 1989 hit “Just A Friend.”

Markie died on July 16, 2021, at 57 years old. Rumors had been spreading about his health. In 2020, the rapper was hospitalized with complications from Type 2 diabetes. He also reportedly spent time at a rehabilitation center after suffering a stroke.

As you can see here, a host of television stars joined the “NCIS: Los Angeles” star in quite an opening to this year’s Emmy Awards.

LL Cool J stopped off at a table backstage where the Emmy Awards trophies were being kept.

In this photo from his Instagram account, you can see him and read the caption he put on the snap.

Additionally, this year’s Emmy Awards featured TV stars and celebrities in person at the event. “NCIS: Los Angeles” or any other show in the “NCIS” franchise wasn’t up for an Emmy at all.

Obviously, seeing the stars pay tribute to Biz Markie is a memory people will hold dear.

‘NCIS: Los Angeles’ Star Revealed Which Rolling Stones Song He Used In Rap

After Rolling Stones drummer Charlie Watts died, many musicians from across all genres paid their respects to the longtime beat-keeper.

LL Cool J of “NCIS: Los Angeles” offered his as well with a little twist.

He said in an Instagram post he got his start learning how to rap using Watts’ drumbeat on “Honky Tonk Woman.”

Charlie Watts was often overlooked in the bands’ sound. Why? When you have a brash guitarist like Keith Richards along with a cocky frontman like Mick Jagger, then you might blend into the background.

For example, rap music and all types of music, for that matter, derive their rhythm from the drummer.

Questlove, the drummer for The Roots, paid tribute to Watts in Rolling Stone recently. He said Watts showed him how a drummer stands out by fitting into a band.

“And I will say that those first five to six years in the Roots, to maintain that discipline,” Questlove said, “especially in a genre that wanted complete flash and trickery, my motivation in the back of my mind was always that Watts became a legend not because of who he was associated with, but because he’s providing the foundation.”

In conclusion, LL Cool J’s rap songs have a beat to them. The rhythm of music keeps going, one song at a time.

Outsider.com