‘Pawn Stars’: Which Star Has Highest Net Worth?

by Jennifer Shea
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The cast of “Pawn Stars” have become some of the History Channel’s most successful reality TV personalities. But it’s a relatively minor character on the show who boasts the highest net worth.

According to TheRichest.com, magician Murray Sawchuck holds that title. With a net worth of $15 million, the magic historian still pops by the pawn shop from the nearby Las Vegas strip, where he performs, to appraise items at the shop for the Harrisons.

The late Richard Harrison, the founder of the Gold & Silver Pawn Shop, also managed to rack up quite a high net worth for a pawn shop owner. By the time he died in June of 2018, he was worth anywhere from $5 million to $8 million.

‘Pawn Stars’ Cast Are Millionaires

While pawn shops – and Vegas pawn shops in particular – can be a little seedy, that doesn’t mean their owners can’t turn a hefty profit. Such appears to be the case for the owners and some of the staff of the Gold & Silver Pawn Shop, who are actual millionaires.

Rick Harrison, son of Richard, has a net worth of $8 million, per WealthyPersons.com. He has taken part in the family business since 1989 and has grown into a seasoned appraiser. His specialty is antique and novelty items.

Expert appraiser Austin “Chumlee” Russell, for his part, is worth an estimated $5 million. He specializes in vintage toys, pinball machines, and sports memorabilia. Between “Pawn Stars” and his side hustle selling custom T-shirts, he’s managed to acquire a nice little nest egg for himself.

Then there’s Rick’s son Corey Harrison. Despite his relative youth, he has a net worth of $4 million and counting. He grew up in the shop, eventually becoming a full-time staffer. The plan is for him to assume Rick’s mantle when his dad retires.

Coronavirus ‘Massively Distorted’ Pawn Industry, Harrison Says

Meanwhile, in an interview last year with Fox Business, Rick Harrison said the pandemic has wrought some surprising changes to the pawn industry.

When coronavirus first hit, the industry saw an uptick as people sold off items to pay bills. But there’s been a temporary reversal in the types of people who are scrambling to make ends meet, according to Harrison.

“The market is so massively distorted right now,” Harrison said last summer. “Believe it or not, middle- and lower-income people are actually doing better now than they were before the virus because they’re getting so much more in unemployment. Most people, if you make under $50,000 a year, and you’re on unemployment, right now you’re making more than when you were working.”

“So basically, it’s upper-income people that are actually pawning and selling stuff right now,” he explained. “Those are the people coming in needing money right now.”

As a result, he said, their shop has been getting a lot of high-end watches and high-end jewelry since the pandemic hit. Most upper-middle-class people did not have the savings to weather this extended downturn, particularly if the pandemic left them unable to work.

As for the stars of “Pawn Stars,” as millionaires who are doing a steady business these days, they seem to be doing just fine.

Outsider.com