Ron Howard ‘Thrilled to Announce’ Joint Memoir with Brother Clint Is a Finalist for Major Award

by Allison Hambrick

Hollywood icon Ron Howard revealed that the memoir he wrote alongside his younger brother Clint is a finalist for an Audie Award. Of course, the Audies honor audiobooks, and theirs was produced with the help of Bryce Dallas Howard. It was a family affair.

“Thrilled to announce that The Boys is an #Audies2022 finalist for Autobiography/Memoir!” Howard tweeted. “Recording the audiobook with Clint and [Bryce Dallas Howard] meant so much to our family, and you can listen to an excerpt here.”

Of course, Howard and Clint both grew up in Hollywood. Howard was a huge child star, appearing in The Andy Griffith Show and Happy Days. Clint also acted throughout his early life. This is largely because of their father, actor Rance Howard. As a child, he would run lines with his father as he prepared for roles. Then, he developed a taste for it.

“It’s kind of an interesting way to grow up,” Howard said of his childhood in Hollywood. “It’s all we ever knew. I started doing scenes with my dad when I was like 2 ½… I used to sit around and watch [my dad’s] rehearsals. And I started picking up dialogue… I learned lines, and then we learned other scenes, and we did it for fun.”

Once Howard joined the fun, Clint was not far behind. Even so, the older brother was the one who found success after he made it over the final hurdle: acting with others.

“And so when I started doing it, when I was like 4, it was just a matter of doing it with other people,” Howard continued. “And I got a big kick out of it. I liked it.”

Ron Howard Talks Old Hollywood Stars

During his incredible and long career, Howard has worked with a number of massive stars. After transitioning into directing, his resume became more and more impressive. From John Wayne to Tom Hanks, Howard shared either a screen or a credit with many of the most renowned actors of several different generations. According to Howard, the work ethic of those classic stars cannot be beat, though one stood out beyond the others.

“’This is a job of work,’ he’d say,” explained the Happy Days star. “If there was a common thread with these folks – Wayne, Jimmy Stewart, Glenn Ford – it was the work ethic. It was still driving them. To cheat the project was an insult. To cheat the audience was damnable. I directed Bette Davis, too – she was the toughest of them all.”

His words mean a lot when considering the large roster of stars he’s acted with and directed. If Ron Howard says Bette Davis is tougher than John Wayne and Jimmy Stewart, he knows what he’s talking about.

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