This Underrated Clint Eastwood Classic Is Currently Streaming on Netflix

by Joe Rutland
this-underrated-clint-eastwood-classic-currently-streaming-on-netflix

There are a lot of people who love watching Clint Eastwood movies and we’re definitely part of that group of people, too. Sometimes, there are movies that bring up special memories or ideas at times. Right now, one of his underrated classics is airing on Netflix and it’s worth making time to see. Back in 1993, our man Clint starred as a Secret Service agent opposite Rene Russo in the flick In the Line of Fire.

Our first glimpse of Eastwood as Agent Frank Horrigan comes when he gets picked up by FBI: Most Wanted actor Dylan McDermott, who plays Secret Service Agent Al D’Andrea. He’s late and it ticks off Frank, but the older agent tells him to not do it again after hearing excuses. There’s a heavy part to this role as Frank happened to be assigned to protect President John F. Kennedy. Yes, he was on detail on that fateful day in Dallas, Texas, on Nov. 22, 1963. It would be a burden that haunts all parts of his personal life forever.

John Malkovich Plays Bad Guy In 1993 Clint Eastwood Flick

Additionally, John Malkovich plays a guy named Booth and he’s planning to kill the current president. Yes, by assassination. Well, In the Line of Fire shows us this storyline that unfolds. Eastwood’s character is a bit older and not able to run like the younger agents. This causes some issues at times, especially when he’s trying to nail down Booth. We also find out that Booth, named for John Wilkes Booth, happens to be a former CIA killer, according to Giant Freakin Robot. This movie grosses $187 million at the box office and receives three Academy Award nominations.

Meanwhile, any good Clint Eastwood fan knows that his movie career received a major boost from Italian director Sergio Leone. That name has its own permanent place in the Eastwood history books. It was Leone who cast Eastwood as the “Man with No Name” character. One of those movies was A Fistful of Dollars. One time, Eastwood did say that the movie could have been an “absolute disaster.”

Fistful of Dollars cost about $200,000 to make,” Eastwood tells legendary movie reviewer Roger Ebert in an interview. “It was a Western shot in Spain as an Italian-German-Spanish coproduction, with a screenplay based on a Japanese samurai movie [Kurosawa’s Yojimbo]. All the producers were arguing among themselves about who was going to pay the bills. It could have been an absolute disaster.” Eastwood says that they got lucky with the movie. He adds that Leone was “for real. We both came out of the box together.” Finally, that flick also is firmly entrenched on the Eastwood resume’ of motion pictures.

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