‘The Sopranos’: Disturbing Fan Theory Casts Tony as a Horror Movie Villain

by Chase Thomas
the-sopranos-disturbing-fan-theory-casts-tony-horror-movie-villain
(Photo by HBO/Getty Images)

The Sopranos was an iconic show in the early 2000s. One of the reasons that the show thrived so much early on was the cast of characters and how different they were. Folks found it all very interesting to see how the characters worked in the Jersey mob. Often, though, the group did not partake in the most pleasant activities. Specifically, the disposal of bodies that they may or may not have gotten rid of. The process was obviously messy, but there were some unanswered questions about the butcher shop where all of this took place. What happened to the rest of them?

Well, one user on Reddit is on the case.

The original post wrote, “To dispose of bodies Tony’s crew serve human flesh at Satriale’s mixed in with normal meal; while disposing of a body with Furio Christopher remarks that it will ‘be a long time’ before he ‘eats anything at Satriale’s.’ David Chase named Tony’s crime family ‘Dimeo’ after Roy Demeo who killed and carved up a large number of victims; there are rumors that members of the Demeo crew practiced cannibalism and blood rituals.”

Did the crew actually serve human flesh to the folks who ate at Satriales? It’s certainly a possibility that they did just that. However, it’s unlikely that the crew went that far, as bad they may have been as a crew.

Another user wrote in the replies, “I never got the impression they were serving it, just using the same equipment to cut it up, so probably some cross contamination occurred, but not like human leg steaks for sale.”

So, we will maybe never know if Tony’s crew took it to that level, but at the very least it was not the best look for the crew.

David Chase on ‘The Sopranos’

David Chase created an iconic show for HBO. Fans of the original Godfather trilogy were delighted to get a television version of the series that so many folks fell in love with.

Chase told THR, “Let’s do a Godfather for television.” And I said, “I don’t want to do that.” I thought, “There already is a Godfather. Why are we going to do that, guys with long coats and hats?” Now, I had conceived of a feature about a mobster and his problematic mother, and I had pitched it to my new agents, and they said, “Mob comedies? They’re dead.” So I let it go. And then when this came up, I thought, “I wonder if that would work on TV.”

He wanted to do something different. He wanted The Sopranos to be a different kind of show. Chase wanted it to be unique. You can watch The Sopranos on HBO Max.

Outsider.com