‘Deadliest Catch’ Star Josh Harris Speaks on Why He ‘Resented’ Fishing After Losing His Father

by Joe Rutland
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(Photo Courtesy Getty Images)

Josh Harris of Deadliest Catch has had to deal with losing his father as part of his time on the show. It also led him to hate fishing. Well, maybe hate is a strong word. Yet there was some resentment on his part after Phil Harris died. Any son who has a close relationship with his father could possibly understand his situation.

Josh Harris Recalls Time After His Father Died On ‘Deadliest Catch’

“Oh, every day — every day — especially after I lost my dad,” Harris said in an interview with Fox News. I resented fishing for quite some time. And the money’s different. It’s not the same as it used to be. We have to actually work really hard for everything we’ve got, and there’s no room for air. Things were a little grim there for a bit, but the Hillstrands really picked me up, dusted me off, and gave me that want and will, and that drive to get back in the industry.”

Harris of Deadliest Catch has learned a lot of lessons in life, too. He happens to sit down and talk about some of them with Outsider’s Jay Cutler in an episode of Jay’s Uncut with Jay Cutler podcast. What are some strange things that he’s seen out on the waters? That and other stuff gets talked about between Jay and Josh.

Reconnecting With Older Brother Shane Has Meant A Lot to Josh

One thing that Josh has done is reconnect with his older brother Shane and have him come on the crew. “After the old man died, we got back in touch,” Harris said in another interview with Entertainment Weekly. “The world isn’t very familiar with my older brother. He was fishing for a while but he was like, ‘Nah, this is stupid,’ and he got his own company and was doing quite well.” But Josh got Shane to come on board. “It’s really hard to find good help in this day and age.”

Harris adds that he and Shane were able to swap roles. “I became the older-younger brother,” Josh said. “I don’t know if he’ll ever go crab fishing again, but it was one hell of a journey for him. (And) I get to be his boss. He worked his tail off. He did it. And we still talk. And he still gives me hugs, so that’s a good start.”

Now, his other brother Jake is getting back to work in the family business. “This is the first time we’ve actually hung out on a daily basis in over 12 years,” Josh Harris says. “I’m really proud of him, and he was always funnier than I was by a long shot and is definitely back full force.”

 

Outsider.com