‘FBI: Most Wanted’: Episode 20 Reveals More of Dylan McDermott’s Backstory As Remy Scott

by Suzanne Halliburton
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New FBI: Most Wanted star Dylan McDermott has the rare opportunity to create a character in the middle of an established show. Remy Scott, he says, is a lot like him.

On Tuesday, in an episode called “Greatest Hits,” we discovered that Remy has a photographic memory of crazy crimes committed in the 1980s. And, he likes being impetuous in his personal life. Remy explained that life theory when he showed up on a judge’s doorstep, after hours, carrying a bottle of expensive whiskey. Earlier, he’d been on the same doorstep, offering a cup of coffee.

“I don’t do practical,” Remy said. “I do impulsive because life is more fun that way.”

Yes, Remy wants to woo Judge April Brooks, who turned down his first request for a warrant, then eventually signed off on one. And he sort of had the approval of his ex-wife. Viewers of FBI: Most Wanted also got to meet Remy’s ex. She’s Carmen Schmidt, an agent who works in Las Vegas. And Carmen helped in the weird case, which involved a hitman-turned podcaster who inspired a wannabe mobster to go on a killing spree.

Mark Schafer/CBS ©2022

Here’s the plot tease of Tuesday’s FBI: Most Wanted episode: “The team searches for a murderer recreating the chilling killings of a notorious ‘80s mobster.”

That hitman was Jackie “The Fox” Bianchi, who was wanted for 14 murders from the late 1980s through the early 1990s. But Bianchi was assumed dead. Back in 1992, he was on his boat when it blew up. However, there wasn’t any DNA matching back then, so there was a flicker of doubt Bianchi still was alive.

Then a man purporting to be Bianchi started a podcast. He enthralled listeners with his killing exploits. Then someone started replicating his hits. The episode opened with a scene from 1989. Three mobsters pulled into a drive through to get ice cream with extra sprinkles. The guy who took their order was Jackie. He pulled out a gun and shot them dead, then walked away.

Flash forward to 2022. A mother was bringing her son and daughter to get ice cream. A man shot them dead. We also see a scene from a construction site. A man tells his boss he’ll be happy to work any job off the books. He’s Italian and wants to be in a mob. He’s fired on the spot.

The detective who investigated Bianchi years ago is convinced it’s Jackie on the podcast. He’s retired, but is willing to help Remy. Jackie’s ex-wife says it’s absolutely not him. But she accidentally provides a clue. She’s cooking spaghetti sauce. Her secret ingredient is soy sauce. Ortiz remembers watching a Youtube video featuring a man and a woman giving cooking tips. He heard the same advice. It was Jackie and his much younger wife. They live in Vegas.

The wannabe hitman keeps killing. But Remy talks Jackie into helping the FBI arrest him. They get the hitman. Jackie tried to escape, but he didn’t get far.

After everything is settled, Remy goes to visit the judge. We think she lets him in for a drink. So stay tuned.

McDermott Said He and Remy Scott Are A lot Alike

Earlier Tuesday, McDermott did an interview with CBS Mornings. And he talked about who Remy is. As fans of FBI: Most Wanted know, McDermott replaced Julian McMahon, who left the show in March. McDermott had been a co-star on Law & Order: Organized Crime. But his story arc as Richard Wheatley had ended. Dick Wolf created both shows.

“I was able to create the character from the ground up, which was amazing,” McDermott said. “I talked to Dick and (show runner) David Hudgins about how to keep myself rooted in the character. (And) I wanted him to have loss in his life. I had loss in my life early on. I wanted to use that in this character because it would fuel me and anchor me in this role for years to come. And that’s proven to be true already.

“I can always refer to and go back to that anytime when I’m playing Remy Scott. I try to use pieces of my life whenever I can because I think it adds that extra element. (And) I sometimes see that on TV … that authenticity.”

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