‘Live PD’ Fans Are Going Nuts Over the Show’s Major Revival News

by Suzanne Halliburton
live-pd-fans-are-going-nuts-over-shows-major-revival-news

Did you hear the news? A Live PD revival soon will hit the airwaves. And fans of the police-centric reality show are rejoicing.

The new show changed its name from Live PD to On Patrol Live. And it switches networks, going from A&E to Reelz.

Live PD host and producer Dan Abrams credited the fans for helping the show find its way back after getting yanked in 2020.

“I want to say thank you to the Live PD Nation,” Abrams said Wednesday on his NewsNation talk show. “I know this wait was long, but we needed the right platform to make this show what it should be. You never gave up the faith and neither did I.”

Abrams also tweeted a story from the Wall Street Journal that provided more details about how Live PD will morph to On Patrol Live.

One fan responded: “Dan – thrilled to hear this. Never should have been pulled to begin with. Thankful another network sees the value. I’ll be watching!”

Another LivePD fan wrote: “BOUT FLIPPING TIME. MR. DAN !!!! THANK YOU MUCH !!!” (That was the fan’s all-caps choice).

Still, another LivePD fan blamed cancel culture for the cancellation. “We need to stop caving in so fast to the Cancel Culture. They are noisy but small fraction of people, and very few probably watched Live PD, anyway. Had A&E simply waited it out, two weeks or so, the Cancel Culture Woke Flakes would have forgotten all about this program.”

Live PD, which ran on Friday and Saturday nights, followed police officers in select U.S. cities as they were out on patrol. It was all live for three hours – there was nothing scripted to it. But A&E pulled the show during the summer of 2020. Millions of Americans protested police brutality after George Floyd died in police custody on Memorial Day in Minneapolis. A&E put the show on hiatus for a week, then canceled it. Paramount also pulled Cops.

While in its original run, Live PD proved to be controversial long before Floyd’s death. The show’s intent was to make police work more transparent. But in 2019, someone died as cameras trailed deputies in Williamson County outside Austin, Texas. The officers chased a man who had failed to dim his lights. The chase lasted for 22 minutes. And once the man stopped his car, deputies used stun guns to subdue him. The man, who told deputies he was sick and couldn’t breathe, died. Live PD never aired the footage. It eventually was destroyed. Details of the man’s death weren’t reported until June, 2020.

The Austin American-Statesman reported that after Williamson County started working with Live PD, police chases jumped by 54 percent. The county settled a wrongful death lawsuit filed by the man’s family for $5 million.

Outsider.com