‘SEAL Team’ Star David Boreanaz Reveals He’s Directing an Episode in Season 6

by Taylor Cunningham
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David Boreanaz is once again stepping behind the camera to helm an episode of his hit CBS drama, SEAL Team.

In an Instagram story, the 53-year-old actor confirmed the project with a picture of the script for the season 6 installment titled Phantom Pattern. On it, it names him as the one and only director.

This won’t be his first time taking charge of TV production, however. Boreanaz has sat in the director’s chair 19 times during his career. His debut was in 2004 for an episode of his past series, Angel. He then went on to lead an episode of The Finder, 11 episodes of Bones, and 6 episodes of SEAL Team.

Aside from starring in and directing his current military drama, David Boreanaz also serves as a series executive producer. So he’s becoming a seasoned production pro. But out of all the work he’s done behind the scenes, directing may be his favorite.

David Boreanaz Opens Up About His Process of Directing ‘SEAL Team’

Last season, David Boreanaz sat down with Paramount + to talk about his directorial process on SEAL Team, and it is a bit more tedious than you’d expect.

Because Boreanaz also stars as the lead character Jason Hayes, he isn’t just in charge of helping the film crew create the perfect fan experience for each episode he directs. He’s also in charge of acting in those episodes, which means he has to be capable of major multitasking.

But he’s passionate about what he does, so he’s willing to accept the challenge.

“If you’re strong enough in your conviction, and you believe in what you’re doing, it becomes so ingrained in you through the prep process of directing,” he shared in an Instagram clip. “Directing, now, is a reflection of the character that I’ve been playing here with Jason Hayes for five seasons. Now, it’s a reflection of his leadership skills, his strength in being able to lead his teams.”

The actor said that every time he takes control, he has to “trust the process” and know that he’s already done all the hard work. When he’s in front of the camera, everything is “in the hands of the camera operators,” so he has to give up the power and “tap into” his character.

But because he puts time and attention into each project beforehand, Boreanaz has complete faith that his team has everything under control.

“I pride myself on the hard work. And I pride myself on the type of worker that I am,” he added. “And that reflects itself in what we see.”

Outsider.com