‘Seinfeld’: The Two Odd Rules Larry David Had on Set

by Emily Morgan
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When Larry David was on the set of the iconic TV show, “Seinfeld,” you knew the day would be far from dull. Look at the two odd rules the king of comedy had for the show, and you can see it was anything but boring both on and off-camera.

The co-creator of “Seinfeld,” Larry David, is undoubtedly known for his unique humor. Just watch any episode of the beloved cult classic, and you can tell that it’s his handiwork.

David made the show’s cast and crew follow two simple yet bizarre rules when creating the episodes. He ordered “no hugging” and “no learning.” You can even see these rules play out onscreen. You’ll find no sweet, sentimental moments between the cast that ends in a hug. Additionally, he made sure none of the cast ever learned their lessons. This way, the viewers could see the cast’s comedy of errors. Rather than learning from their mistakes, the characters stayed the same.

While the move was unprecedented in sitcoms at the time, the show obviously became a huge hit. The strange, sometimes dark humor played well with audiences, and it became a pop culture phenomenon.

David once elaborated on his far from standard strategies during an interview with The Atlantic. “A lot of people don’t understand that “Seinfeld” is a dark show, he said about the show that made him a household name. “If you examine the premises, terrible things happen to people. They lose jobs; somebody breaks up with a stroke victim; somebody’s told they need a nose job. That’sThat’s my sensibility.”

Even though the four friends are genuinely awful people who don’t learn their lessons, the show still became one of the most popular shows of an era. It’s been over 20 years since a new episode of the show aired, but the show continues to be talked about by fans, old and new. The show’s massive success is a testament to its creators.

Why Larry David took a step back from Seinfeld

David was nominated four times for Emmy Awards for his writing on the show. In addition, he took home one Emmy for the episode titled “The Contest.” However, David decided to step down from his position after the show’s seventh season despite its worldwide success.

Although he remained on friendly terms with the cast and crew, he left due to the pressure of having to write better episodes with each preceding season.

During an interview with Uproxx, Jason Alexander, who played George Costanza, explained David’s internal struggles with the show. “[Larry] always saw the doing of “Seinfeld” as a very stressful thing. If it broke, it was going to be he and Jerry that broke it, but I think he took on more of that responsibility.”

Although Larry stepped down from the show after Season 7, he continued to be the voice of George’s boss, the fictionalized George Steinbrenner, until the end of the series. He also has a reunion with the cast when he returned to help write Season 9’s two-part finale.

Outsider.com