‘American Pickers’ Star Frank Fritz’s Head Is a ‘Rolodex’ with 25 Years Worth of Picking Info

by Amy Myers
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American Pickers alum Frank Fritz has an impressive arsenal of knowledge in his noggin, and he’s not shy about it. On the show, Fritz demonstrated just how versatile his wisdom is while on picks with his former co-star Mike Wolfe. From bikes to lamps to toys, the Iowa native knows just about everything when it comes to collectibles.

Even before the show’s start in 2010, Fritz and Wolfe had been long-time picking partners. Together, the two scavenged for anything that they believed they could get a quick buck for. And before long, the two were traveling the country with a camera crew in tow. And while their adventures together certainly changed, one thing remained the same – Frank Fritz’s wealth of information.

In an interview with Quad-City Times, the American Pickers star explained that he holds onto about 25 years worth of picking information in the back of his mind. Fritz also shared that he never purchases an item without having a buyer in mind first.

“I used to sell mostly on the Internet,” he said. “I also have a Rolodex right here (tapping on the side of his head).”

“You can pretty much ask me anything,” Fritz continued. “The first year of the Barbie was 1959. G.I. Joe was 1961. I have a lot of these useless stats. That’s one reason I like to talk to people and share all of this stuff. It’s also the reason my prices are so good. Everybody can get in at my place, and you can take home a little piece of the show.”

Regardless of how wise the American Pickers alum is, he claims that he’s pretty down-to-earth, too.

“What you see is what you get,” he reminded. “Like I said, I’m a simple guy.”

‘American Pickers’ Star Says Camera Crew Is Usually Wrong About Picking Location

Fritz and Wolfe clearly have the picking instinct. They can just glance at a location and determine whether the contents are worth digging through. Obviously, this skill requires years of experience, so for the camera crew, it might not come quite as easily.

“The camera guys get there ahead of us, and they’ll take a look around and get an idea of what’s there,” Fritz recalled. “They’ll call and say, ‘This is great!’ Or, they’ll say, ‘There’s nothing here.’ They’re usually wrong.”

Even though the cameramen may not have the best sense collectibles, they are still a valued part of the American Pickers team that brings Fritz and Wolfe together with everyday Americans with great collections.

“The best part is meeting the people,” Fritz said. “It’s not the stuff. Believe it or not, not everybody has cable. A lot of the people have never seen the show.”

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