Mike Rowe Celebrates the ‘Certain Type of Person’ Who Can Run a Liquor Store

by Alex Falls
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Mike Rowe is known as an advocate for hard-working jobs. He spent many years on his TV show Dirty Jobs demonstrating some of the difficult jobs countless people do every day.

One such job that can bring its own share of difficulties is owning and operating a liquor store. Liquor store owners probably encounter a huge range of personalities that can go from kind customers to hard-nosed criminals. Rowe took a moment to recognize this difficult profession and noted it takes a “certain type of person” to successfully operate a liquor store.

In his tweet, Rowe said, “It takes a certain type of person to run a successful liquor store. You’ve got to be tough and determined. Stubborn, even. But you also need to be friendly, shrewd, and knowledgeable. John at Amendment 21 is that type of person.”

The TV personality used his Tweet also as a chance to plug one of the local businesses in Baltimore. Amendment 21 operates in the heart of Baltimore and offers a huge variety of drink options.

Rowe has been involved with the liquor business quite a lot as of late. Recently, he launched a new business venture called Knobel Spirits. The company distributes Rowe’s special whiskey made just as his grandfather used to make.

“The whiskey is here,” Rowe said in a previous Instagram post. “We’ve had some supply chain issues. But at long last, Knobel Tennessee Whiskey is here and I am in a celebratory mood. So perhaps you’ll join me in a virtual drink. Carl Knobel was my granddad, and Dirty Jobs was a tribute to him. So, too, was Mike Rowe WORKS. So, 100 percent of the net proceeds go to the Mike Rowe WORKS Foundation when you buy a bottle of Knobel.”

The Mike Rowe WORKS foundation helps provide opportunities to high school graduates who choose to skip college to become trade experts instead. Rowe founded the program in 2008. It has since given more than $5 million in scholarships to future blue-collar workers.

Outsider.com