Alabama Donates $25,000 Toward Kentucky Flood Relief

by Jim Casey
alabama-donates-25000-toward-kentucky-flood-relief

Country Music Hall of Fame band Alabama—comprised of Randy Owen, Teddy Gentry, and Jeff Cook—donated $25,000 to aid those in Kentucky affected by the recent catastrophic flooding.

During their concert in Sharpsburg, Kentucky, on Aug. 6, Alabama presented a check to The Foundation for Appalachian Kentucky, a nonprofit that provides financial assistance to Kentucky families, farms and businesses suffering as a result of the flooding. Alabama made the donation via their nonprofit, June Jam Foundation, which distributes funds to other nonprofits and service groups.

“With all the devastation caused by the floods in eastern Kentucky, this is a very emotional time,” said Randy Owen. “Alabama wanted to offer help in a small way.”

“We hurt for the loss of life and destruction caused by the floods in Kentucky,” added Teddy Gentry. “Hopefully these funds can help the families, farmers and businesses that were affected. They are in our prayers.”

At least 37 people died in Eastern Kentucky as the result of catastrophic flooding in late July. President Joe Biden and First Lady Jill Biden traveled to Eastern Kentucky on August 8 to meet with Kentucky Governor Andy Beshear and view the devastation.

Live in Concert Tour

Alabama is currently on its Live in Concert Tour, after recently celebrating its 50th Anniversary Tour.

Upcoming shows include stops in Ohio, Utah, Nevada, Colorado, and more.

Randy, Jeff, and Teddy began playing together in 1969 as Young Country. Eventually, they morphed into Wildcountry in 1972. They rebranded as Alabama in 1977 and signed a record deal with RCA Nashville in 1980. Unlike many country vocal groups of the time, Alabama was a full-fledged band. The guys played their own instruments, melding aspects of rock and country.

From 1980 to 1987, the band scored an unprecedented 21 consecutive No. 1 singles. They also won numerous awards, including CMA Entertainer of the Year in 1982, 1983, and 1984.

Outsider.com