Beechwood Hall, the Historic Manor Once Owned by Tim McGraw & Faith Hill Being Demolished by Developers

by Clayton Edwards
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(Photo by David M. Benett/Dave Benett/Getty Images)

Beechwood Hall is a massive two-story antebellum manor that stands in Franklin, Tennessee. Some believe the manor should be a historic landmark. It’s one of the oldest antebellum homes in Franklin. Additionally, it stands near where the Battle of Franklin took place during the Civil War. The property also has connections to country music history. Unfortunately, developers are reportedly demolishing it.

Tim McGraw and Faith Hill owned Beechwood Hall for years. They even filmed some memorable music videos in the sprawling log-built manor. The couple shot the video for McGraw’s 2006 hit “My Little Girl” and the video for Tim & Faith’s 2007 single “I Need You” in the home. Long before they owned the property, Hank Williams owned it. However, Lovely Franklin states that Williams bought the home in 1951 and never lived there full-time before his death two years later.

Faith Hill and Tim McGraw sold Beechwood Hall, a horse stable, and 620 acres to a Columbia, Tennessee-based development firm BKDM in July of 2021. BKDM bought the property in partnership with Pinnacle Asset Management’s Brock Kidd and Columbia’s mayor Chaz Molder. At the time, the developers said they hoped to preserve the historic property.

“I’m a proud Tennessee native and have many wonderful memories from my family’s time in Leiper’s Fork,” Brock Kidd said in a statement after purchasing Beechwood Hall. “This farm could very well be the most beautiful in our state. And the fact that it is located six minutes from downtown Franklin makes it all the more remarkable.”

Unfortunately, that’s not what happened.

Developers Demolish Beechwood Hall

Currently, Beechwood Hall is being demolished by the developers that purchased it. A group of concerned citizens put together a petition to save the historic home. SaveBeechwood.org shows photos of the current state of the manor and shares some information.

The website notes that when the new owners bought the property they “promised the seller and the community they would preserve and restore Beechwood Hall.” That’s not happening. “Since the new owner’s purchase, the house has been slowly dismantled and the front and back doors are being left wide open,” the site states.

Additionally, it alleges some underhanded dealings. “Carefully selected ‘experts’ have been deployed to create a perception that the property is ‘too far gone’ to be restored. However, the site claims that this is a false narrative. Furthermore, it claims that the new owners created conditions to support the narrative in recent months. Additionally, the site points out that the Williamson County Heritage Federation recently removed Beechwood Hall from its list of “Sites to Save.”

You can head to SaveBeechwood.org to get more information on what’s going on and sign the petition to save the historic property from demolition.

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