HomeEntertainmentMusicCountry MusicCelebrate ‘National Horse Day’ With George Strait’s Best Cowboy Songs

Celebrate ‘National Horse Day’ With George Strait’s Best Cowboy Songs

by Brett Stayton
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(Photo by Cooper Neill/Getty Images)

If you’re going to play in Texas and you don’t have a fiddle in the band, then you better at least have a cowboy in the band. And if you’re going to wear a cowboy hat, it’s not imperative that you’ve broken bones on the rodeo circuit, but you should probably at least know how to ride a horse a little bit. Or be a legit country musician. On that note, George Strait used Instagram today to remind folks that he’s not just all hat no cattle.

He celebrated “National Horse Day” with a picture that has him looking like the ultimate cowboy. Earlier this year, Strait also celebrated “National Cowboy Day” with an awesome video from Wrangler Jeans.

George Strait: The King of the Cowboy Song

Cowboys Like Us

If there was an official anthem for the cowboy lifestyle, this just might be it. Cowboys Like Us was released in 2003 as the second single off of George Strait’s Honkytonkville album. It peaked at #2 on the Billboard Hot Country charts. The song is actually a nod to the cowboys that ride around on steel horses (presumably trucks or motorcycles) but ties that modern spin back into the traditional cowboy lifestyle. If you go looking, you can also dig up an excellent live duet version of the song that Strait recorded with Eric Church a while back.

“…And cowboys like us sure do have fun
Racing the wind, chasing the sun
Take the long way around back to square one
Today we’re just outlaws out on the run
There’ll be no regrets, no worries and such
For cowboys like us
…”

Amarillo By Morning

This song was originally recorded by Terry Stafford in 1972 without a lot of fanfare. A decade later, George Strait added more fiddle and re-recorded Amarillo By Morning for his Strait To The Heart album. It peaked at #4 on the Billboard Hot Country charts and has become one of Strait’s signature hits. The lyrics tell the story of a man who has wrestled with the hardships of the authentic cowboy lifestyle, hardships faced without regrets though as he continues looking forward to riding the rodeo circuit.

… But I’ll be lookin’ for eight
When they pull that gate
And I hope that
Judge ain’t blind
Amarillo by mornin’
Amarillo’s on my mind…”

I Can Still Make Cheyenne

Another song rooted in rodeo culture, this emotional tune addresses the heartache of a cowboy who seemingly chose his rough-riding lifestyle over a romantic relationship for just a little too long. It was the third single off of George Strait’s 1996 Blue Clear Sky album. The song peaked at #4 on the Billboard Hot Country charts. Just as the man decides to shift his priorities from the cowboy lifestyle to being a more present lover, his heart gets shattered by the woman on the other end of the phone. With a broken heart, the cowboy aims his truck back towards the Wyoming line and gets back in the saddle.

“…She said, don’t bother comin’ home
By the time you get here, I’ll be long gone
There’s somebody new and he sure ain’t no rodeo man
He said I’m sorry it’s come down to this
There’s so much about you that I’m gonna miss
But it’s alright baby
If I hurry I can still make Cheyenne
Gotta go now baby
If I hurry I can still make Cheyenne…”

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