Jason Aldean Recalls Route 91 Mass Shooting In Upcoming Docuseries

by Taylor Cunningham
jason-aldean-recalls-route-91-mass-shooting-upcoming-docuseries

In an upcoming Paramount+ documentary, Jason Aldean will give his first in-depth interview detailing his experience at the Route 91 mass shooting.

In 2017, the Country music star was headlining at the Route 91 Harvest Festival in Las Vegas when 64-year-old Stephen Paddock opened fire on the crowd from the window at the Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino. Sixty people died from the attack and another 867 were injured.

In a four-episode special, titled 11 Minutes, Aldean will share his story from that night along with first responders and fellow survivors.

You can catch the official trailer below. However, some of the content is graphic and disturbing. Use discretion before viewing.

Jason Aldean Recalls the First Moments of the Attack

Jason Aldean was on stage when the first shots were fired from a 32nd-floor room. In the clip, the singer recalls hearing the sounds but not understanding what was happening until someone with his team screamed for him to take cover.

“When I turned around, my bass player was just looking at me like a deer in the headlights,” he says. “And my security guy was on stage at that point, telling me to get down, waving me off the stage.”

Aldean escaped with no injuries. However, he continues to carry the trauma of survivor guilt.

“It’s hard not to feel a little guilty. I mean, those people were there to support us,” he shares.

’11 Minutes’ Shows Never-Before-Seen Footage From the Harvest Festival Tragedy

11 Minutes will include never-before-seen police bodycam footage and around 200 hours worth of cell phone video. It also explains how the SWAT team moved in on Paddock before officers found him dead from a self-inflicted gunshot wound.

“This situation was probably the highest level of intensity that I’ve ever been in,” retired SWAT officer Billy Marx said.

But the stories of the survivors and heroes, who were not just police officers, are at the heart of the documentary with many interviews that highlight regular people who continued running into the line of fire to rescue the injured. The documentary also delves into the widespread violence that has been plaguing society in recent years and explores ways to prevent similar attacks in the future.

“It’s important that people know the truth out of respect for those we lost, out of those who were injured, those who are still mentally and physically scarred … that everybody’s spirits and legacies remain intact. Those friendships made that night in those 11 minutes were made for a reason. The story, to me, wasn’t about a shooter,” festival emcee Storme Warren says in the trailer. “It was about people helping each other.”

Outsider.com