Lauren Alaina Sings Dolly Parton Classic As Emotional Tribute to Late Great Grandmother

by Suzanne Halliburton
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Lauren Alaina sang classic Dolly Parton with a nod to her great grandmother when she took the stage at the Grand Ole Opry earlier this week.

Alaina wore a hat and coat made by Ethel, her great grandmother. So that’s a big hint at which Dolly Parton’s song Lauren Alaina performed.

Yes, it was “Coat of Many Colors.” Alaina posed for a photo in front of her own portrait hanging on the wall at the Opry. And she captioned it for her Instagram feed:

“Cracked the COAT for the perfect outfit for Opry Country Classics night. I inherited my great-grandmother’s real-life “Coat of Many Colors.” I was so honored to sing my hero, Dolly Parton’s, song to honor mawmaw’s memory on favorite stage last night. Ps: peep my pic on the wall in the background. Never getting over it.”

We’re thinking Alaina’s Mawmaw would be most proud of the performance.

Parton wrote the song back in 1969 when she was touring with Porter Wagoner. In her 1994 memoir. Parton said she wrote the song while she was riding on the tour bus. When she couldn’t find paper, she jotted down her thoughts on one of Wagoner’s dry-cleaning receipts. The song became the title track of Parton’s album, which she released in 1971. The “Coat of Many Colors” single, which reached as high as fourth on the country music charts, celebrates its 51st anniversary this month.

Parton’s mother really did make her a multi-colored coat. She took rags, sewed them together with love, and made a beautiful coat.

Parton sang: “Now I know we had no money, but I was rich as I could be. In my coat of many colors my momma made for me.”

Now, listen to Lauren Alaina sing classic Dolly Parton. A fan account posted the audio on Instagram.

The Grand Ole Opry inducted the 27-year-old during a February ceremony. Trisha Yearwood had the honor of introducing her fellow Georgian.

And like this week’s performance, the February induction also was about family.

“Ever since my daddy was a child, it was his dream to play the banjo at the Grand Ole Opry,” Alaina told the Tennessean. “So, when I was a girl, of course, I learned about this Disneyworld of country music, a magical place called the Grand Ole Opry, where all of country music’s most successful artists played.

“Though I listened to it on the radio as a child, I never attended the Opry in person until the day I made my debut,” she said. “And, my dad’s gotten to play with me a couple of times since I started playing there. My family’s made so many of their dreams come true at the Opry.”

Outsider.com