Riley Green Delivers Acoustic Cover of Waylon Jennings’ Classic ‘Where the Corn Don’t Grow’

by Courtney Blackann
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(Photo by Jason Kempin/Getty Images for Big Machine Label Group )

Waylon Jennings first recorded it in 1990. Then Travis Tritt took it and made it his own six years later. Now, Riley Green is putting an acoustic spin on “Where the Corn Don’t Grow” with a soulful performance. And it’s one you’ll definitely have to witness for yourself.

A tribute to his concert in Orange Beach, Alabama this weekend with Travis Tritt, country music’s Riley Screen shared a video of himself on social media playing the hit. Only his version had a simple guitar to back Green’s incredible vocal styling. The tune sounds absolutely beautiful from the emotional, gritty voice of Green.

He plays the classic hit so stunningly that you barely even notice the Outsider-appropriate wall behind him.

“In honor of playing at the @thewharfamp in Orange Beach, Alabama with the legendary @realtravistritt … here is one of my favorite country songs ever.” Green captioned the post.

Interestingly, the song originally didn’t make it big when country icon Waylon Jennings released it in 1990. “Where the Corn Don’t Grow” gained more acclaim when Travis Tritt re-released it in 1996 and it debuted in the top ten for new country singles.

Since that time, it’s become a favorite of country artists – and it’s been played plenty of times. But there’s something about Riley Green’s soothing voice that makes this tune new again.

Riley Green on Finding His Sound

When it comes to Riley Green’s music, he says he wants to continue to develop his sound without changing things up too much. The “There Was This Girl” singer wants his fans to be able to identify him just by his musical stylings and the sound of his voice. But he also wants to create new music. Overall, he just doesn’t want to mess with too much.

“I think it’s really hard for a new artist to go from ‘Hey, I know this song, but I don’t know who sings it’ into ‘Oh, and that’s a Riley Green song.’” Green explained in a phone interview with the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. “I think that probably comes from maybe too much bouncing (around stylistically) with your first few singles.

Green goes on to say:

“Ten years ago, your average Joe couldn’t go into the studio and record something and put it out on Spotify or Amazon or iTunes,” he added. “Now that you have so much music, this overflow of music, you’ve got to find a way to stand out, and I think that’s kind of by having your own sound.”

And if you’re a fan of Riley Green, then you know he’s already done a great job of cultivating a sound that makes him unique but also incredibly fun to listen to. We expect even more big things from this guy in the future!

Outsider.com