‘Storage Wars’ Shows Off Some Vintage Tins in New Clip

by Amy Myers
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(Photo by: Sepia Times/Universal Images Group via Getty Images)

When Storage Wars star Darrell Sheets found a set of old tobacco tins, he couldn’t have been happier. Not only did these vintage pieces mean an impressive paycheck, but it also meant he would get to visit the “most interesting guy in the world.”

No, he didn’t step inside a Dos Equis commercial, but the man inside the cigar shop did kind of resemble a bald version of Jonathan Goldsmith.

Meet Anto Kamarian, owner of Cigars by Chivas for more than 20 years. Kamarian has dedicated his life to the art of tobacco and even published a book about his lounge and the history of tobacco’s impact on the social world. With all of his worldly knowledge on the topic, it’s no wonder Kamarian was the Storage Wars star’s first stop after finding the tobacco tins.

Check out what Sheets discovers from his visit to the Pasadena cigar lounge.

The clip comes ahead of tonight’s new episode of Storage Wars. If Sheets knew about the tobacco tins before placing his bid, we’ll likely also see the most interesting bidding war in the world.

‘Storage Wars’ Star Gets a Lesson in Tobacco History

After taking a first glance at the tins that Sheets fumbled with on the shop counter, Kamarian already knew that the Storage Wars star had an impressive inventory on his hands. The first tin he picked up was a Craven from 19th century Spain. Nobleman Don Jose Carreras founded the tobacco company. Sheets couldn’t believe that the tin had survived this long and was still in decent condition.

“That tin is that old?” the Storage Wars star asked incredulously.

But according to Kamarian, the tins had to be durable in order to properly serve their function – keeping the tobacco fresh.

“The whole idea of the tin cans was if they are airtight, the tobacco will remain fresh,” the cigar lounge owner explained.

The next tin was a George Washington Cut Plug, popular in the late 1800s to the early 1900s. While its primary use was to store tobacco, its square shape and handle also made it a perfect lunch pail for school children. The Winner Cut Plug tin had the same shape and dual function as the George Washington, but this one came with an interesting backstory. According to the Storage Wars guest star, the company’s owner was from London, and he established the line of tins in order to provide jobs for English citizens.

Finally, Kamarian saved the best tin for last and picked up the “Singing Waiter” tin from the early 1900s. The “roly poly” design gave the piece a whimsical quality and was the ideal choice for collectors.

Altogether, Kamarian estimated that the Storage Wars star could get $1,650 for his find.

Outsider.com