‘The View’ Invited to Film at Museum of Tolerance After Whoopi Goldberg Controversy

by Allison Hambrick
American actress Whoopi Goldberg during the presentation of the Pirelli 2020 Calendar at the Verona Philharmonic Theater. Verona (Italy), December 3rd, 2019 (photo by Marco Piraccini/Archivio Marco Piraccini/Mondadori Portfolio via Getty Images

After Whoopi Goldberg’s controversial comments on The View, Rabbi Abraham Cooper invited the show to film at the Museum of Tolerance. Earlier this week, Goldberg drew the ire of many when she made controversial remarks about the Holocaust.

During a discussion about a Tennessee school banning the book Maus, the comedian said that the Holocaust “not about race,” but was about “man’s inhumanity to man.” The accuracy of her statements became a massively controversial topic that landed her a two-week suspension. Goldberg apologized publicly both via Twitter, on The View, and on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert.

“It upset a lot of people which was never, ever, ever, ever my intention,” she explained to Colbert. “I thought it was a salient discussion because as a black person, I think of race as being something that I can see. People were very angry. And they said, ‘No, no, we are a race.’ And I understand.” She further apologized, adding she will “work hard not to think that way again.”

Despite her mea culpa, ABC President Kim Godwin chose to suspend her from The View for two weeks.

“Effective immediately, I am suspending Whoopi Goldberg for two weeks for her wrong and hurtful comments,” Godwin’s statement read. “While Whoopi has apologized, I’ve asked her to take time to reflect and learn about the impact of her comments. The entire ABC News organization stands in solidarity with our Jewish colleagues, friends, family, and communities.” 

Naturally, the decision itself was controversial. Some felt it was too harsh, while others felt it gave Goldberg much needed time to reconsider her thoughts.

Rabbi Discusses Goldberg’s The View Controversy

One individual who thought the punishment fit the crime was Rabbi Cooper. He felt that it was important to educate the audience on the tragedy of the Holocaust. As a result, suspending Goldberg and taking steps to explain why her thinking was wrong is a necessary step in his opinion. That is precisely why he suggested a trip to the Museum of Tolerance–for the entire week. Ideally, this would “enlighten” the show’s viewers.

However, Cooper made it clear that he does not believe Goldberg is anti-semitic. She has long been an ally of the Jewish community. Her actions merely warrant education and accountability.

Alternatively, Johnathan Greenblatt, the head of the Anti-Defamation League, felt Goldberg’s suspension from The View was unnecessary given her apologies. He did share Cooper’s opinions about accountability, but he felt she already demonstrated it.

“We sometimes have people in public places who can say clumsy things about race or faith or gender,” Greenblatt explained. “I don’t believe in cancel culture. I like the phrase that my friend Nick Cannon uses. We need ‘counsel culture.’ In the Jewish faith…we have a concept called ‘teshuva,’ and ‘teshuva’ means redemption. It means all of us have the power to admit when we do wrong and to commit to doing better.”

He then continued: “I heard Whoopi say that she’s committed to doing better. I accept that apology with the sincerity with which she delivered it.”

Outsider.com