‘Yellowstone’: Taylor Sheridan Told EP David Glasser the Ending the Day the Show Started

by Lauren Boisvert
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Executive producer David Glasser knows something we don’t know; the “Yellowstone” ending. According to Glasser, Taylor Sheridan sat him down and told him how the show ends on the day it started.

Apparently, Glasser said in an interview with Insider, Taylor Sheridan knows the “Yellowstone” ending, no matter how many seasons there are. “He knows every character and backstory,” said Glasser. “He told me the ‘Yellowstone’ ending the day we started. When that happens, I don’t know. But he knows where every character ends up.”

That’s good news for “Yellowstone” fans. At least now we know that there’s a plan, and the show won’t suddenly end. Paramount seems unlikely to cancel “Yellowstone” before it’s complete, so here’s hoping we get to see it to the end of Taylor Sheridan’s vision. The show is such a huge success for the streaming platform, that I’d bet money it’ll go on as long as Sheridan needs it to.

I wonder how large and complicated the “Yellowstone” story bible is; now there’s a piece of production memorabilia I’d love to see. To sift through Sheridan’s notes on “Yellowstone,” it’s a writer’s dream come true.

David Glasser Talks Taylor Sheridan Knowing His Audience

Not only does Taylor Sheridan the “Yellowstone” ending, he also knows exactly who he’s making his shows for. He knows his audience well, and knows what his fans want to see. It all stems from his real life experiences as a rancher.

“Taylor’s a cowboy,” said Glasser. “His writing comes in the evenings. His days are spent being a rancher and farmer. He knows his audience well and he served up something that was for that audience.”

Sheridan’s audience wants sprawling Montana horizon, mountain ranges, cattle ranching, and horses. They want accurate Native American representation, realism, grit, and danger. From politics to shootouts, Sheridan delivers. He has a dedicated fanbase, and they know what they’re going to get from him. “1883” did so well on Paramount+ because “Yellowstone” had an established fanbase. The franchise will continue to thrive because of the audience.

Why Calling the Prequels an ‘Anthology’ is the Right Move for ‘Yellowstone’

According to “1883” executive producer David Glasser, the prequel series – “1883” and the new “1932” – are going to be considered an “anthology series” with “Yellowstone.” In my opinion, this is a great move for the franchise. Mostly because that word, “franchise,” doesn’t really encapsulate all that Sheridan’s works are. They’re meaty, they’re complicated, and they need a title that represents that.

When I hear “franchise” I think “One Chicago.” I think “NCIS.” When I think of “Yellowstone,” it’s something more serious. It’s dark, and gritty, and everything smells like leather and horse. That’s the imagery I get of “Yellowstone,” anyway. The word “anthology” really captures that image that I have.

Additionally, calling the series an anthology literally translates into marketing; there’s potential for a beautiful complete anthology DVD collection when all the shows are complete. Hopefully, something like that is in the cards for “Yellowstone” fans.

Outsider.com