Grand Teton National Park’s Top 10 Things to Know Before Visiting This Summer

by Jon D. B.
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Want to make the most of your summer visit to Grand Teton National Park? Make a #GrandPlan and heed this expert advice ahead of time.

As with every summer before, Grand Teton National Park is looking forward to welcoming visitors for a busy summer. But park visitation has increased dramatically in recent pandemic-laden years. In fact, April 2022 was the second-busiest April on record for the park with 67,541 visits that month alone. And with this significant increase in peak visitation comes the need for extra preparation both from the park and visitors.

To help, Grand Teton National Park hopes NPS travelers will “Make a #GrandPlan and follow our list of the top 10 tips you should know for visiting the park in 2022.”

So make sure to plan ahead, recreate responsibly, and help ensure this iconic landscape may be enjoyed by future generations by diving into the park’s Top 10 below.

1. Summer 2022 Information You Should Know

With changing visitation, construction projects, and the Jackson Hole Airport closure, there’s so much to plan for this summer, but don’t worry, we’ve got you covered. Here’s what you should know for the 2022 summer season:

  • Reservations are NOT necessary to enter Grand Teton National Park. Reservations ARE required for lodging and all campgrounds in Grand Teton, however, and are mostly booked for the peak season.
  • The southern portion of the Moose-Wilson Road is under construction. From Memorial Day to Labor Day, the southern section of the road from Granite Canyon Entrance to the Laurance S. Rockefeller Preserve will close, except on weekends (7 pm Friday to 7 am Monday) and federal holidays. Learn more at go.nps.gov/moosewilson.
  • The Jackson Hole Airport will close April 11—June 27 for a full runway reconstruction.
  • Three major road construction projects will take place in Yellowstone in 2022. Projects will cause major delays. Visit Yellowstone road improvement projects.

2. A Ranger in Your Pocket

Download the National Park Service App before arrival to make the most of your visit. It’s an invaluable tool that lets you download crucial park information to use offline (many NPS sites don’t allow for cell service). Then, when you’re here…

3. Bear With Us: Bears are Active Everywhere in Grand Teton National Park

Grizzly and black bears are active in Grand Teton, including developed areas. Always stay 100 yards away from bears and wolves. Learn about recreating in bear country on the park safety in bear country page.

To learn how to tell the difference between brown and black bears in Grand Teton National Park, see Outsider’s How To Tell The Difference Between a Black Bear and a Brown Bear next.

4. Keep the Wild in Wildlife

Roadside wildlife viewing is popular, but please keep a safe distance and keep the road clear. Use pullouts or pull completely off the roadway to the right of the white line. It is illegal to feed any wildlife.

See Outsider’s National Parks Journal: How to Be BearWise with Great Smoky Mountains’ Lead Wildlife Biologist for more expert tips.

5. It’s Ruff for Dogs in Grand Teton National Park

Remember: National parks are not always the best place for your dog. Dogs are not allowed on trails, pathways, beaches, inside visitor centers, or in park waters. For in-fur-mation, visit the park pets page.

6. Crowds are Late to Rise and Early to Set

Parking at locations throughout the park can be difficult to find during peak hours. Visit the park before 9 a.m. and after 4 p.m. to avoid the crowds. For more information, visit the park’s parking page.

7. Sloooowwww Dooooowwwwnnn!

Obey posted speed limits and maintain a safe following distance from other vehicles. Wildlife is active near park roads. Slow down and be vigilant. In high visitation areas, be alert for pedestrians and follow adjusted speed limits. Follow the nighttime speed limit of 45 mph on US HWY 89/191/26.

8. Give the Smolder the Cold Shoulder

Campfires are limited to designated and installed fire rings in the park. Fires should always be attended to and must be completely “dead out” before leaving a site. Visit tetonfires.com for fire safety information.

9. It’s Okay to Ghost Us and Leave No Trace

Dispose of trash properly and follow Leave No Trace principles by packing out what you bring in.

10. There’s More to Explore Outside Grand Teton National Park

Jackson Hole and Wyoming are full of places to explore. Make a side trip and visit nearby attractions.

For more pro tips ahead of your summer excursion, be sure to check out Grand Teton National Park’s Complete Top 10. Happy trails, Outsiders!

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