Alan Jackson Says ‘No Summertime Blues to Be Found’ in Glorious On-Stage Pic

by Jennifer Shea
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Country superstar Alan Jackson has been getting back on the road, and he’s taking to Twitter to celebrate that fact.

“No #SummertimeBlues to be found. 🤠,” Jackson posted to Twitter on Wednesday, alongside a picture of himself onstage with a guitar in front of a microphone.

Alan Jackson Played Hometown Show Earlier This Month

In early July, Jackson headed to his hometown of Newnan, Georgia for an outdoor concert. His performance there raised over $2 million for tornado relief efforts in the town, which was laid low by an EF-4 tornado earlier this year. The proceeds went to the Coweta Community Foundation’s tornado relief fund.

“I was hoping we’d be able to do something to try to help down here,” Jackson said in a statement. “It’s just been amazing how this community came together to make this happen.”

The benefit concert was originally supposed to include 16,000 attendees, but about 20,000 fans were ultimately let in. Country musicians Chris Young and Caylee Hammack opened for Jackson, who took the stage wearing his trademark cowboy hat.

It was Jackson’s first live performance since two drive-in concerts in June of last year. And he seems to have thoroughly enjoyed himself.

The set and lighting design for the concert was a hybrid of the rig for Jackson’s upcoming fall tour and an outdoor system that would also look nice for the cameras.

Watch a recap of the Alan Jackson concert here:

Jackson Has Tour Dates Coming Up

Meanwhile, Jackson has some tour dates scheduled for the next three months, starting with an Aug. 6 show in Denver, followed by an Aug. 7 show in Salt Lake City. The tour winds its way through Oklahoma, Missouri, Wisconsin, Iowa, South Dakota and Michigan before ending up in Nashville at the Bridgestone Arena.

This May, Jackson dropped his latest album, Where Have You Gone. It is his 16th studio album. Jackson wrote the title track himself, and three other tracks on the album grew out of his daughters’ weddings and his mother’s funeral, making for a deeply personal record that lasts for 20 tracks.

Judging by his social media posts, the Grammy winner is more than ready to play a mix of old songs and new ones at his upcoming shows, which are right around the corner.

Outsider.com