Chris Stapleton to Open Nascar Awards with Television Debut of New Song ‘Arkansas’

by Will Shepard
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The NASCAR Awards are upon us and just as importantly, so is Chris Stapleton’s new song. Stapleton is set to television debut his new song “Arkansas” at the show.

Stapleton is going to open the TV presentation with a live performance.

Indeed, you better check this out.

NASCAR shares the news that Stapleton will be performing the song for the first time on TV at the start of the show. The organization says:

We’re just a few hours away from @ChrisStapleton opening the #NASCARAwards with the television debut of his song, “Arkansas.”

Stapleton and The Award Show

Although this is not the true release of the song, fans are excited nonetheless. The song was released on October 22 of this year, just four weeks ago.

On Wednesday night, the NASCAR Awards kick off, and headlining the event is Chris Stapleton. NBC Sports’ Kelli Stavast and Marty Snider will co-host the presentation.

Stapleton’s single is fitting for the award show. As the awards are mostly for those drivers who can go the fastest, “Arkansas” is perfect. For example, the song talks about driving a Porsche 911 over 100 miles per hour across the country. Unlike NASCAR whose races are now strictly legal, he sings about how he is running from the law.

In addition, Stapleton sings about stopping in Little Rock for BBQ while driving through Memphis. As well as another police mention, “blue lights in our rearview.”

NASCAR began in the prohibition. The races started as bootleggers running from the authorities in souped-up cars. “Arkansas” is a fan favorite for obvious reasons.

“Havin’ so much fun that it’s probably a little bit against the law / All the boys and the girls down there sure do know how to have a ball / If you wanna get down, gotta get down to Arkansas.”

Certainly, NASCAR and country music fans alike are eager to watch the performance. Undoubtedly, the performance will be so strong it might be against the law.

Outsider.com