Country Throwback: Alan Jackson Hit ‘Tall, Tall Trees’ Stands No. 1 on Billboard Charts 25 Years Ago Today

by Matthew Wilson
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Those trees are getting pretty tall now. It’s been 25 years since the Alan Jackson hit song “Tall, Tall Trees” topped the Billboard country music charts.

The song was an instant hit when Jackson recorded it in 1995. It featured on his compilation album “The Greatest Hits Collection” as a new track. Upon release, it performed incredibly well for Jackson providing another stitch in his cowboy hat. The tune featured an up-tempo beat and Jackson with all of his country swagger and charm.

The song explores the grand ideas of romance, and Jackson’s narrator is nothing if not a romantic at heart. To win the affection of a significant other, Jackson’s character graduated from the school of go big or go home. He promises his love a “big limousine,” or an extravagant mansion if she would be with him. The title of the song is taken from the narrator’s impossible promise of “tall, tall trees and all the water in the seas.”

Alan Jackson Covered George Jones’ Tune

While some may think the country classic sprang from Jackson’s own head, he actually got a little help from a country legend. “Tall, Tall Trees” is actually a cover of an older country song that didn’t take off in quite the same way. George Jones and Roger Miller wrote the song all the way back in the 1950s.

Jones included the song on his 1958 album “Lon Live King George,” and Miller also recorded the song himself on his 1970 album “A Trip in the Country.” Neither version took off in the way Jackson’s version did. But Jackson has his predecessors to thank for the hit.

Despite coming from two separate eras, Jackson’s and Jones’ careers will forever be tied. In 1999, Jackson rallied behind Jones at the CMA Awards after the ceremony only offered Jones a short window to play his song. While performing his own song, Jackson switched to Jones’ “Choices” to give the country music legend his due.

When Jones passed away in 2013, Jackson was one of several musicians to play at his funeral.

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