Country Throwback: Reba McEntire Covers Dolly Parton’s ‘9 to 5’ on ‘Reba Live: 1995’

by Joe Rutland
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Country music singer-songwriter Reba McEntire knows how to make an audience come alive, especially when performing a song from longtime friend Dolly Parton.

McEntire, during her “Reba Live: 1995” tour, talked a bit to her adoring fans before launching into a cover version of Parton’s classic “9 to 5.”

Here’s a clip of McEntire singing that classic country song.

Reba McEntire Talks About 40-Year Friendship With Dolly Parton

Obviously, the respect that McEntire shows for Parton and her music comes through in the performance.

Both country music superstars recently got together for a chit-chat on McEntire’s new Spotify podcast, “Living & Learning.”

Parton is asked on the podcast if she’s pondering retirement. The short answer? No.

“So, as long as I’m living, I’m a workin’,” Parton says. “And like Reba, we’ve talked about retiring. I said, ‘What would I do? There’s no way I could retire.’

“I’ve always said I want to be just like one of those little fainting goats, you know,” Parton says. “I just always want to be running along and just keel over one day. And just die right in the middle of a song. Hopefully, one that I’ve written.”

‘Fancy’ Remains Staple Of Reba McEntire’s Musical Work

Meanwhile, one of McEntire’s classic songs, “Fancy,” remains an important part of her musical history.

The song is a simultaneously sad and uplifting story.

It tells the story of a woman whose mother sent her away from their home to free her from poverty. However, to do so, the mother gives the 18-year-old Fancy to wealthy older men. “…just be nice to the gentlemen, Fancy. They’ll be nice to you,” McEntire sings. “…Here’s your one chance, Fancy, don’t let me down… Your mama’s gonna move you uptown…”

Recently, Reba McEntire shared what “Fancy” means to her and why it has been such a popular song since 1990.

“It’s a rags-to-riches story,” McEntire told CountryLiving.com. “I love rags-to-riches stories. Cinderella, Annie Get Your Gun, all poverty and then make it big in the world. Well, she did, too. Fancy—she had a lot going against her and she persevered and moved on.”

Bobbie Gentry originally recorded “Fancy” in 1969. Her version never reached the popularity of McEntire’s.

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