Elvis Presley’s Palm Springs Honeymoon House Selling for $2.5 Million: Take a Video Tour

by Emily Morgan
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You can channel your inner-Elvis Presley by snatching up his Palm Springs honeymoon house, but it will come with a price. 

The King of Rock and Roll’s Palm Spring’s hideaway recently hit the market yet again. As of now, the price tag sits at a cool $2.5 million. 

From 1966 to 1967, Presley rented the house but only paid $21,000 to do so. It may sound like a steal today, but in 1966, that equates to $169,699.81 in 2020. 

In addition, it’s also the same pad where Elvis and Priscilla originally planned on getting married on May 1st, 1967. After the press caught wind of the couples’ plan, the two decided to elope in Las Vegas.

Following the wedding, the couple returned to their Palm Springs home to celebrate their honeymoon. Precisely nine months later, on February 1st, 1968, Lisa Marie Presley was born. 

Elvis Presley’s Unique, Futuristic Pad

With its modern, futuristic style, the pad has become known as the “House of Tomorrow.” The home was restored in the ’90s, but it still maintains its mid-century character with rock walls, a floating fireplace, and terrazzo flooring. 

 The home has been featured in a variety of television programs as well as magazines. A few examples include Condé Nast Traveler, Marie Claire, Fodor’s, Travel Channel, AAA Westways, Time, and the famous interior design magazine Architectural Digest.

The 5,000 square feet home has five bedrooms and five bathrooms. It also has plenty of outdoor space as well as a unique in-ground pool. 

The house first came onto the market in 2014 with a $9.5 million price tag. Since then, the price fell roughly a dozen times. In 2019, the cost of the house dropped to $3.2 million. Even though the home sat in escrow multiple times, no one has ever officially snagged the keys to the Rock-n-Roll King’s former palace. 

Check it out for yourself in a video tour below. 

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