On This Day: Clint Black Receives Star on Hollywood Walk of Fame in 1996

by Emily Morgan
on-this-day-clint-black-receives-star-on-hollywood-walk-of-fame-in-1996

After Clint Black spent most of the ’80s and ’90s determined to make a name for himself in the country music scene, his hard work would finally pay off on Dec 12, 1996. 

On that day, exactly 24 years ago, Clint Black eternalized his country music success when he received his star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. 

However, the long road to the Hollywood Walk of Fame wasn’t completely free from its various roadblocks. For six years, Black supported himself during the day as a construction worker, bait cutter, and fishing guide. At night, Black would perform at bars, hoping someone would notice his talent. 

After grinding in lounges and bars for half a decade, Bill Ham (former manager for ZZ Top) took an interest in Black. This meeting would be the catalyst that pushed Black into the country music universe. Soon after, he signed with RCA and released his first debut single, “A Better Man,” which was No. 1 on “Billboard Hot Country Songs” in 1989. That year he would release his first critically acclaimed album,  Killin’ Time. 

In 1991, the Grand Ole Opry inducted Black as an official member. 

Clint Black Memorializes His Accomplishments

In 1996, after four chart-topping albums, Black would finally seal his worldwide achievement when he received his induction onto the Hollywood Walk of Fame. 

After 23 Top-Ten singles coupled with millions of albums, Black proved to himself and the world that he finally made it out of the dark, dingy lounges that gave him his start. He was the fourth country music signer to receive a star on the Walk of Fame. Gene Autry, Roy Rogers, and Garth Brooks would pave the way for Black’s Hollywood star.  

Before his induction, Black married actress Lisa Hartman in 1991. After he received his star, he had also appeared in the movie Maverick, along with several other country artists, including Waylon Jennings, Reba McEntire, and Vince Gill.

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