On This Day: Dolly Parton Releases Debut Album ‘Hello, I’m Dolly’ in 1967

by Thad Mitchell
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When it comes to the ranks of the country music industry, at the very top is where you will find legendary singer Dolly Parton.

With an illustrious career spanning a more than a half-century, Parton is one of the most well known artists in the world. Her fame doesn’t just stop in the country music field either as artists across all genres note her to be an inspiration. While now an icon with previously unheard of staying power, even Dolly Parton had to start somewhere.

She made her introduction to the world in 1967 with her first-ever studio album offering. The album is fittingly called “Hello, I’m Dolly” and was released on this date (Feb. 13) 54 years ago. It would be the first of her 51 totals studio albums to date. Now 75-years-old, the East Tennessee native shows no signs of slowing down and just put out new music late last year. Her latest album, a Christmas theme called “A Holly Dolly Christmas” was put out to the pubic just last year.

Parton was 21-years-old and a music industry unknown when she put out “Hello, I’m Dolly,” but that was about to change. Though not many have heard of Dolly Parton yet, the album did quite well for for a first time release and put her on the map.

Dolly Parton Charts Two Single From Debut Album

The studio album would rise quickly on the Billboard Top Country Albums chart, peaking just outside the top 10 at the 11th spot. Released by Monument Records, the album would also give Parton her first two of many hit songs. “Dumb Blonde” and “Something Fishy” would reach rankings of 24 and 17, respectively.

“Dumb Blonde” was the first single release from the album, debuting at number 24 on the Billboard charts. Charting for a total of 14 weeks, it would later top at 24.

“Something Fishy” was release as a single on May, and would be Parton’s first ever top 20 hit song. Peaking at the 17th spot and charting for 12 weeks, many consider the song to be a “breakout” hit.

Perhaps the biggest accomplishment from the album for Parton is that it caught the attention of singer Porter Wagoner. Wagner would go on to serve in a mentor-like position for the rising singer. The two remained in touch until his death in 2007. Parton made many appearances on Wagoner’s show “The Porter Wagoner Show.”

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