On This Day: Dolly Parton Releases ‘Heartbreak Express’ Album in 1982

by Jacklyn Krol
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On this day, Dolly Parton dressed her 1982 record, Heartbreak Express.

This marked Patton’s 24th studio album. The record featured hits like the title track, “Do I Ever Cross Your Mind,” among others. “Single Women” reached No. 7 on the country radio chart. Surprisingly, the single was first heard on Saturday Night Live in 1980. The tune was written by show writer Michael O’Donoghue.

Overall, the album reached No. 1 on the United States Country Album Charts and No. 106 on the all-genre Billboard Top 200 Chart. She co-produced the album with Gregg Perry and wrote eight of the ten songs.

According to Dolly Parton’s official website, the song “Hollywood Potters” was inspired by her time on the film, 9 to 5. She witnessed extras who worked extremely hard to catch a small break with minimal success.

Although Parton was no longer in her previous pop phase, the title track was the perfect example of how to bridge the two genres together. The rest of the record took fans back to her country roots.

She re-recorded her 1969 smash hit, “Blue Ridge Mountain Boy.” Another re-recording is “Do I Ever Cross Your Mind?.” Chet Akins originally released the song on his 1976 record, The Best of Chet Atkins and Friends.

Dolly Parton on Her Career

In the 1980s, Dolly Parton hit rock bottom and had a “complete breakdown.”

“I could totally relate to how people do get on drugs or alcohol, how people do commit suicide, because when you’re a tender, loving, caring, sensitive person, you feel like you can only stand so much heartache and sorrow,” Parton told ABC News.

Parton credits her faith with bringing her out of her tough time. “After I got through that, prayed through that, worked through that, I became so much better because I could see so much more inside people,” she continued. “I was so much more humble because I never could toughen my heart… I just had to strengthen the muscles around it.”

Parton credits herself as a sensitive person, which also translates into her songwriting. “When people say ‘How many [songs]?’ I say, ‘I don’t know. I don’t count them,’” Parton revealed. “I’ve written thousands of songs.”

“Everything was music to me… if someone was hammering on the other hill at the sawmill, I’d start writing a song with that rhythm,” she continued. Dolly Parton even still purchases yellow legal pads and cassettes off of eBay to write with.

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