On This Day: Shania Twain’s ‘You’re Still the One’ Nominated for Grammys Record of the Year in 1999

by Emily Morgan
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Twenty-two years ago today, Shania Twain’s tenderhearted hit song, “You’re Still the One,” snagged its Grammy nomination for “Record of the Year” in 1999.

“You’re Still the One” was the third country single from Shania Twain’s 1997 album, Come on Over. The song’s release marked the first time Twain would have a crossover country hit, as it was her first song released to pop and international markets. 

Released in 1998, the single quickly took the No. 2 position on charts, becoming Twain’s first top-ten hit on the “Billboard Hot 100.” Even though it never topped the list, critics have recognized it as Twain’s most successful crossover record, as well as one of her most lucrative singles ever. 

Written by Twain and her husband at the time, “Mutt” Lange, “You’re Still the One” is a tender ode to a significant other. The lyrics describe a couple powerfully overcoming obstacles in their relationship.

“Looks like we made it 

Look how far we’ve come my baby 

We might have took the long way 

We knew we’d get there someday.”

How The Couple’s Ill-fated Ending Inspired Shania Twain’s Grammy-Winning Hit

Many speculate the couple’s tumultuous relationship directly inspired the hit song. Twain and Lange divorced ten years later in 2008 after fourteen years of marriage.

Despite the couple’s unfortunate ending, at the 1999 Grammy Awards, the song’s success would be eternalized after winning two awards that night. 

The song won “Best Country Song” and “Best Female Country Vocal Performance.” However, the track lost the title of “Record of the Year” and “Song of the Year” to Celine Dion’s ” My Heart Will Go On.”

In an interview, Shania Twain describes the “magic” of getting to write the record with Lange. 

“Mutt and I spent a lot of time apart as I was promoting and touring, and he was in studios working on tracks and arrangements as we wrote,” Twain said. “It’s surprising that we were able to write all this stuff with so little time together. We wrote independently and merged ideas when we joined up.

“I remember feeling very excited about the counter line sung by Mutt as backing vocals in “You’re Still the One,” she adds. “As I sang the chorus melody repeatedly while working out the lyrics, he kicked in with the counter line, ‘You’re still the one, and it gave me chills. All of a sudden we had a hit chorus. It was a magic moment.”

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