Reba McEntire Reveals Most Important ‘Manners’ She Lives By

by Matthew Wilson
Reba-McEntire-Reveals-Important-Manners-She-Lives

Reba McEntire is opening up about what she considers golden rules to live by and the most important manners people can have.

On the latest episode of her podcast “Living & Learning with Reba McEntire,” she discussed manners and what she tried to instill into her son Shelby Blackstock. Shelby is the country singer’s only child, which she shares with ex-husband Narvel Blackstock. He is now a 30-year-old race car driver, but co-host Melissa Peterman remembered him as a polite young boy. She asked McEntire what her secret to manners was.

McEntire said she insists you should never be late when meeting someone.

“Number one, when you’re late and you mentioned this earlier, you’re showing disrespect to people and their time,” McEntire said. “It’s like your time is more important than their time. So if you’re late and you’re making them sit there for five to two hours waiting on you. I’m sure they might have had something a little more important to do than wait on you. So respect other people’s time. I think that’s huge on manners.”

Reba McEntire Also Believes in Listening During a Conversation

Another important manner McEntire believes in is to listen. She said it’s important to listen during a conversation and give another person the opportunity to talk.

“Share the conversation. Don’t dominate,” McEntire said. “I think that’s a very big manner. Listen to other people when they’re talking. Let them have the time to comment or to change the subject and talk about something. Listen, be kind, be attentive. And respect other people. Another good thing to do is not interrupt people when they’re talking.”

Additionally, the country singer said she’s willing to learn as much as teach. McEntire realizes manners and customs have changed somewhat since she was a child, and she was curious to learn what younger generations valued.

“I think it’s a little more loose. I don’t think it’s as rigid, I don’t think it’s practiced as heavily as it was when we were kids. But I want to know – what are the new manners nowadays?” McEntire said. “I do think kids want to be treated more equal. And that just seems strange to me. But that’s what I want to learn. What are the new ways of doing manners today? What are we learning, what are our kids learning?”

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