WATCH: Hank Williams Sr.’s Grandchildren Cover His Songs, Reflect on His Global Influence

by Jennifer Shea
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Hank Williams Sr.’s grandchildren are looking back on his legacy and trying to honor it in their own lives.

Holly Williams, Hilary Williams and Sam Williams recently talked to CMT about their grandfather’s impact on country music and music in general all over the world.

The Three Musicians Remember Hank Sr.

“When I first went to Europe when I was 19, I realized how many Hank Williams fans were over there,” Holly Williams recounted. “And I just started realizing, okay, I’ve always thought my grandfather was this like older guy who wrote a few hits. I think [when I was] a child my dad’s fame was so massive it almost trumped that of Hank Williams. And it took me a long time to realize the legend that Hank Williams was.”

Meanwhile, Holly is a talented musician. She lives in Nashville. Her most recent work is the 2013 studio album The Highway

Her brother Sam is a singer-songwriter who also lives in Nashville. He released the single “Gemini” in 2019, preceded by “The Lost Grandchild’s Plea” in 2018 and “Darkwater” in 2016, according to Sounds Like Nashville

“He was such a hard worker,” Sam Williams said of his grandfather. “And he was very committed to his craft, and writing songs and emoting things that could relate to the people of Alabama, to the people where he was from, that somehow reached people all across the world.”  

Hilary is also a singer. Her 2019 album, My Lucky Scars, deals with a car crash she got into with her sister Holly. They both suffered serious injuries, according to Fox News.

“There are songs that are about real life experiences, and they’re raw and real, and we can all relate to them,” Hilary Williams said. “My grandfather’s music was just more melancholy and sad. So when I was in a sad mood, I liked to listen to him. But he has upbeat songs too.”

An Early Exit

The grandchildren believe Hank Williams Sr. had more great music left to produce when he died.

“People had no idea where he was gonna take country music, or music in general,” Sam Williams added. “Because he [passed] at such a young age. He was gone before Elvis came around. I always have believed that he was gonna take music to heights that people had no idea he was going to.” 

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