60-Ton Crane Falls Into Building in Downtown Oklahoma City

by Joe Rutland
crane-falls-into-building-downtown-oklahoma-city
(Photo Courtesy Getty Images)

A crane has fallen into a building within downtown Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, according to a report from TV station KOCO. Officials responded on Saturday to Main Street, where the crane fell. Additionally, one person reportedly headed to the hospital due to injuries suffered. No other injuries were reported in the incident.

As far as closures are concerned, parts of Robinson and Sheridan avenues have been shut down. Additional photos of the crane collapse are available from The Oklahoman newspaper right here.

Woman Survives Crane Crash In New York City

In New York City, a woman miraculously survived a crane falling on her car. Reports indicated that a 22-year-old woman was in her car at the time it collapsed. The crane would come crashing down as she waited for a light to change at a stoplight. She would come really close to dying or facing serious injuries. Also, there was a passerby near her car and he missed out on the crash, too. “I expected to see somebody dead or something, or crushed,” a witness to the crash said. “[But] a few seconds later, [a man] pulls her out and she was a little bit confused herself—surprised that she made it.” The driver only suffered minor injuries in the crane’s failure.

While we have covered crane situations involving a building and a car, what about one with an animal? We have one for you. Rescuers used a crane to save a bull. This happened after a staircase attempt failed. So, we turn to India and take note of this situation. Rescuers hoisted the bull out after using strong ropes.

It’s quite the operation to see happen. People and many interested bystanders were watching the whole thing go down. Thankfully, the bull reached ground level safely and the entire operation worked smoothly. It is not every day that you see a bull lowered down like this one. Cranes are definitely useful things to have when in need. We have noted here that they are dangerous, too.

Outsider.com