DC Trucker Convoy Organizer Speaks Out About Issues They’re Protesting

by Josh Lanier
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A convoy of truckers set to descend on Washington D.C. later this week will cause something all-too-familiar in the capital: gridlock. An organizer said hundreds of big rigs will block the Capital Beltway and other roads to “choke” the city like a “giant boa constrictor” to protest several issues.

Bob Bolus, who runs a truck parts and towing business in Pennsylvania, said truckers want to send the government a message, according to Fox News. They’re angry about rising gas prices, vaccine mandates, and immigration. Bolus said blocking major roads will get lawmakers’ attention.

“I’ll give you an analogy of that of a giant boa constrictor,” Bolus said. “That basically squeezes you, chokes you, and it swallows you. And that’s what we’re going to do D.C.”

Bolus’ group isn’t the only convoy planning on protesting. There are others, including The Peoples Convoy and American Truckers. Each group is different, but they’re following in the tire treads of the Freedom Convoy in Canada. That group of truck drivers used their trucks to block roads and bridges across Ottawa. Police arrested more than 150 demonstrators this week and towed dozens of trucks to end the protests that began on Jan. 29.

Police officials in Washington, D.C., told an NBC news station that they will have extra officers throughout the city beginning on Wednesday.

Bob Bolus doesn’t think the police will arrest him. His protest will be peaceful, he said. Though, he realizes it will cause for residents.

“There will be a lane open for emergency vehicles, they’ll be able to get in and out and all that,” Bolus said. “We will not compromise anybody’s safety or health, one way or the other. As far as if they can’t get to work, geez that’s too bad.”

Prime Minister Trudeau: Freedom Convoy Blockade Is Over

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said Monday that the blockades throughout that nation’s capital are over. But he isn’t ready to give up his emergency powers, ABC News reported.

“The situation is still fragile,” he told reporters. “The state of emergency is still there.”

The prime minister took the rare step last week of invoking Canada’s emergencies act to end the demonstrations. The move gave the government more latitude to deal with protestors. For instance, authorities could declare certain areas of the city as no-go zones and arrest anyone there without permission. They could also freeze the bank accounts of freedom convoy members.

Trudeau called the move “necessary” to break up the convoy’s hold on the city. His opposition said the move was a step too far. The goals could have been accomplished without such a draconian measure.

Canada’s Parliament will vote on Monday if Trudeau can continue to wield the emergency powers, CTV News said.

Outsider.com