Barack Obama Gives Rapper Drake Advice, Reveals ‘The Key’ in Portraying Him in A Potential Biopic

by Halle Ames
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Yesterday, former President Barack Obama joined The Tonight Show to discuss rapper Drake potentially playing Obama in a movie.

The former President, who is a fan of the artist, gave his approval on Drake filling in as Obama‘s double for a movie. The Tonight Show host Jimmy Fallon asks Obama if he has any advice for the 34-year-old rapper’s role to nail playing Barack Obama.

“Well, apparently, based on all the people who do an imitation of me, the key is to talk really slowly. And the… slower… the more… strange pauses there are… in your speech,” Obama said before being cut off by Fallon.

Barack Obama’s Love for Music

Earlier in the interview, the 44th President shared his love for music growing up. He touches on all the different backgrounds and cultures that inspire it.

“I don’t come from a musical family, but I think that partly because I had such a strange childhood, right. My mom is from Kansas. Dad from Kenya in Hawaii lives in Indonesia for a while, etcetera. What it meant was, I was moving around a lot. I was an only child until I was nine. So I think that music becomes one of those things that keeps you company. And it becomes a way to connect with other people and kids your age. I still remember the first two albums I ever bought with my own money, right, Stevie Wonder’s ‘Talking Book’ and Elton John’s ‘Goodbye Yellow Brick Road.'”

Barack Obama then references how different music is an expression of America and why it is so important.

“Michelle and I, as I describe in the book, I think used music as a way of reminding people of the magic of America is, we have all these traditions that we draw from, that all get kind of jumbled up, right. You know, you’ve got country music and blues and rock ‘n’ roll and gospel and hip-hop and, you know, reggaeton. And all that stuff is this medley. This blend of, you know, Irish folk songs and African drum and, you know, all these different traditions. And that, in some ways, is what makes America exceptional. It’s the reason why American culture exports everywhere.”

Outsider.com