‘Chicago Fire’ Taylor Kinney Gets to Meet His Childhood Icon in New Photo

by Leanne Stahulak
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“Chicago Fire” star Taylor Kinney grew up watching Formula 1 racing. And he recently got to meet one of his racing icons.

Kinney posted a picture to his Instagram page featuring him and Ferrari F1 team member Gino Rosato. It doesn’t say where they ran into each other or how, but it looks like Kinney immediately recognized his childhood icon.

“Being a kid watching #formula1, then growing up to be the same kid watching the damn thing! Lots of love! To the man…. @ginorosato,” the “Chicago Fire” star captioned his post.

Rosato, who started working in F1 with Ferrari in the 90s, even posted the same picture to his own Instagram page. “What a gentleman @taylorkinney111, so cool !!” Rosato captioned his own post. Maybe Rosato will get Kinney behind the scenes at Ferrari now, if the actor’s as big a fan as he claims.

‘Chicago Fire’ Star Taylor Kinney Details One Episode That ‘Stuck Out’ In His Mind

Earlier, in 2017, “Chicago Fire” star Taylor Kinney spoke with Front Row Features about his time on the hit show so far. He’s played Kelly Severide for almost a decade on the show, but during all that time, one moment in particular stands out to him.

“In one of the earlier seasons, either two or three, there was an episode where a child got stuck in a chute and died,” he began. Kinney explained how the firefighters honored the child by wearing their dress blues at the very end of the episode. The child’s family drove past the firehouse, where everyone saluted them. The flag at the firehouse also rested at half-mast out of respect for the kid and their family.

“It wasn’t initially supposed to be the ending,” Kinney said. During filming, the actors don’t shoot the scenes in the sequence in which they appear on the show.

“I remember watching the episode later and it was really powerful. The way they put it together, the editors, was great. It ended up being the last scene, and I remember thinking, ‘Wow, that was pretty great,'” the “Chicago Fire” star said.

“Sometimes you’re in the throes of work, you’re in the trenches, and you don’t realize at the moment what’s going to resonate when they put it together,” he concluded.

Kinney brings up a great point. Actors of all kinds of TV series and movies have to work within the frame of just one scene. They don’t always see the vision of the director and crew until the premiere. And when that happens, they can feel the same awe as the audience members, even though they were directly involved in creating it.

Outsider.com