Clint Eastwood: One Challenge the Iconic Cowboy Faced When Filming with Horses

by Matthew Wilson
Clint-Eastwood-One-Challenge-Iconic-Cowboy-Faced-When-Filming-with-Horses

Clint Eastwood may be one of the greatest on-screen cowboys. He’s known for his various westerns he made early in his career. But the actor also faced one unique issue when it came to filming with horses.

Despite being on-screen partners, Eastwood was allergic to horses.

According to Vintage News, the actor had an allergy to the creatures, despite having to be in their close presence. It was reported in American Film that Eastwood tried to limit his time around horses. For instance, in films he directed, Eastwood would attempt to complete scenes involving horses in one take.

A horse allergy is similar to a cat or dog allergy, which the actor is also allergic to. Additionally, Eastwood was reportedly allergic to his co-star, an orangutan, in “Every Which Way but Loose.” Despite the allergy, the two’s bond formed the highlight and heart of the film for many audiences.

Horse’s dander, also known as flecks of skin and hair, can cause the allergy. Even being in contact with a saddle can be enough to cause a reaction in some. Allergic reactions range from hives, sneezing, watery eyes, and rashes. Usually, antihistamines like Benadryl can help relieve symptoms.

Clint Eastwood Starred in Various Westerns

After getting his start on the TV series “Rawhide,” Eastwood starred in around 20 different westerns across the course of his career. Many audience members would never realize the actor suffered for his art. But maybe that’s why his gunslingers always seemed so angry.

Perhaps his most famous role was as the Man with No Name in the “Dollars” trilogy. But Eastwood also directed himself in several westerns as well, where he hand more control over his affliction. Finally, the well seemed to run dry with 1985’s “Pale Rider,” one of Eastwood’s last westerns.

It’s rumored that Eastwood took an extended break from westerns because of his allergy. But that seems unlikely to be the case. The most obvious reason is audiences’ tastes had changed by the 1980s. And westerns weren’t as big of a draw as they once were. The actor decided to revisit the genre one last time in 1992 with “Unforgiven,” his swan song to the genre that made him famous.

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