‘Deadliest Catch’: Is Keith Colburn Considering Retirement?

by Amy Myers
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For over thirty-five years, Deadliest Catch star Keith Colburn has dominated the Bering Sea, pulling up hundreds of crabs from its depths each year. Now, at age 58, it’s possible that the fisherman could be considering retirement.

As the captain of The Wizard, Colburn has seen his fair share of dangerous situations. From crew injuries to powerful storms, there’s been no shortage of excitement in his career on sea. So, as he continues to think about his future in the fishing industry, the Deadliest Catch star has started to give more thought to hanging up his slickers for good.

The most taxing aspect of his career has been the increasingly violent weather. According to Colburn, he sees more storms and more intensity within the past few years than he ever has before. Having to constantly navigate through these treacherous conditions is a tiresome task, and it certainly isn’t any easier for his deckhands, either.

In an interview with Nicki Swift, the Deadliest Catch star admitted that it’s “getting harder and harder for me to just go through it.”

At some point, he’s bound to ask how much more he can take.

But Something Keeps Calling the ‘Deadliest Catch’ Star Back to the Water

Just as soon as he starts to warm up to the idea of a permanent break from the industry, he remembers why he became a crab fisherman in the first place.

“Yeah, you know, but then you leave town,” the Deadliest Catch star said, describing the moment when his vessel heads back out onto the Bering Sea. “And it’s beautiful, it’s back home, and look at the stars, you set your gear, awesome fishing.”

For all the trouble he runs into during his trips, there’s definitely a worthy reward. If not the money then just the experience of being where few dare to venture.

“You can’t take that away from me right now,” Colburn stated.

People Can Never Fully Retire from Outdoor Jobs

Colburn’s thoughts on retirement are something many of us Outsiders can relate to. Such a big part of his personality and existence has been dependent on what he does on the water. For better or for worse, he’s a fisherman. Once you take away something that significant to a person, what else is there?

Ironically, those that don’t fish for a living look forward to the days when they can cast a line from sunup to sundown without anywhere else to be. So, of course, even when he isn’t taking out The Wizard onto Alaska’s icy waters anymore, he’ll still be throwing his crab pots into the water somewhere else.

After all, in reality, we all want to retire from the stress, not from the job.

Outsider.com