‘Deadliest Catch’: Watch Sig Hansen Talk About Rough Start for Northwestern This Season

by Amy Myers
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Here at Outsider, we get that everyone has those days at work when nothing seems to go right. Whether it’s an extra-long morning rush hour, a stressful meeting with your biggest client or a yearly review that went sideways, bad days are going to happen. However, even some of our worst days may pale in comparison to a rough workday on Deadliest Catch.

That’s why the captains and crews of Deadliest Catch always need to be ready for chaos. From harsh weather to faulty machinery, it takes only seconds from an average workday to turn into a crisis situation. No one knows this better than Captain Sig Hansen of the Northwestern. Hansen is a man of numbers, and when the ship doesn’t deliver on its crab count, he immediately makes the necessary decisions within his team to get the results they need. However, as Discovery demonstrated in a recap of a recent episode, sometimes on Deadliest Catch, the odds are out of your control.

‘Deadliest Catch’ Captain Sig Hansen Battles with Machinery Issues

Forget the fact that you’re dealing with icy, unyielding waters, little sleep and humongous sea creatures. Put aside the fact that unless you’re sitting in the captain’s chair, you’re likely soaked from head to toe all hours of the day. Let’s focus on one of the most dangerous elements on Deadliest Catch–the vessels themselves. Under the wrong captain, the crew risks having faulty machinery on deck that can cause accidents and sometimes even deaths on board. So, we understand why their stress levels are a bit higher than everyone else’s.

And as Deadliest Catch shows in its recap, Northwestern Captain Sig Hansen has struggled to keep the vessel’s crane in working order. After spending nearly a week at dock trying to repair the vital piece of equipment, the crew lost valuable time on the water. So, on top of the pressure to keep his crew safe and ship working, Hansen had a shortened deadline.

“I don’t know why we’re jinxed this season,” the captain admitted inside the vessel. “It’s hard for me to swallow this pill because we keep this boat right and tight.”

While it might be understandable that a neglected vessel might have issues with their machinery, the Deadliest Catch captain seemed sure that his crew did everything they needed to ensure the ship’s success. However, Hansen and his daughter, Mandy, who acts as the captain-in-training, found themselves docked once again to take care of the crane.

“It took quite a few days to get that crane remanufactured,” Hansen said. As he continued to speak, an alarm sounded from the lower deck before the lights shut off.

“Please tell me there’s nothing wrong down there,” the flustered captain pleaded as he headed towards the stairs. “Please don’t be a fire.”

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