DMX’s Ex-Wife Pays Tribute to Late Rap Icon on Her 50th Birthday

by Madison Miller
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DMX, a famous rapper and actor, known for songs like “Party Up (Up in Here),” “Where the Hood At?” and “X Gon’ Give It to Ya,” passed away at the age of 50.

His family announced his death on April 9. He had been hospitalized for a week after suffering from a heart attack reportedly due to a drug overdose. The rapper, whose birth name was Earl Simmons, had a history of substance abuse issues and criminal charges. He pleaded guilty to tax fraud in 2017. He had also had other arrests for possession of weapons, narcotics possession, and driving under the influence.

However, he had been seeking ways to get help. In 2019, he canceled a tour and instead sought treatment for addiction. He said it was to put his family and sobriety first.

“I just need to have a purpose. And I don’t even know that purpose, because God has given me that purpose since before I was in the womb, so I’m going to fulfill that purpose…whether I want to or not, whether I know it or not, because the story has already been written. If you appreciate the good, then you have to accept the bad,” he told GQ in 2019.

Ex-Wife Pays Tribute

Since his death, a number of people have been leaving touching tributes for the rapper expressing his impact on the music and entertainment world. His ex-wife, Tashera Simmons, posted a tribute to the late rapper on her Instagram.

She wrote, “Happy 50th birthday to me. With much prayer, pulling. Crying and a roller coaster of emotions. I couldn’t bring myself to just celebrate and close the last 50yrs of my life without celebrating the life of one of the most important person in the world to me, my Ex-husband.”

The two were married from 1999 until getting divorced in 2010. The couple also had four children together.

“Everything we went through was necessary. It made me the woman I am today. As I enter a new chapter in life, I don’t walk in it the same,” she also wrote.

The family of DMX released a statement on Friday to share the news of his passing with the rest of the world.

“Earl was a warrior who fought till the very end. He loved his family with all of his heart and we cherish the times we spent with him. Earl’s music inspired countless fans across the world and his iconic legacy will live on forever. We appreciate all of the love and support during this incredibly difficult time. Please respect our privacy as we grieve the loss of our brother, father, uncle and the man the world knew as DMX. We will share information about his memorial service once details are finalized,” the statement read.

DMX’s Music and Legacy

DMX had a profound impact on the music world. He had released a long string of No.1 albums from the 1990s to the early 2000s. Many of his songs and his albums reflected the dark and troubling personal struggles DMX suffered through during his life.

His 1989 debut album, called “It’s Dark and Hell Is Hot,” started his profound career. He was nominated for three different Grammy Awards and was the first musician to have their first five albums reach No.1 on the Billboard charts.

He was known for his eccentrically electric concert performances as well as a number of collaborations alongside other influential rappers. His music, however, had elements of a difficult childhood and a lot of untethered trauma.

“Why is it every move I make turns out to be a bad one? Where’s my guardian angel? Need one, wish I had one,” DMX said in his song “Damien.”

His ex-wife was far from the only one to express that the artist had passed too soon. Chris Redd, an actor and comedian on “Saturday Night Live,” paid tribute to him. He wrote on Twitter, “My childhood and love for music would not have been the same without this man. DMX was easily my favorite artist growing up. I had every album, every ruff Ryder song, followed any artist he endorsed. Man….RIP the dog. There will never be another like him.”

Others like LeBron James and Shaquille O’Neal posted social media tributes as well.

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