Dolly Parton and Other Female Singers Release ‘PINK’ to Raise Funds for Breast Cancer Research

by Jennifer Shea
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Dolly Parton is teaming up with fellow performers Monica, Jordin Sparks, Sara Evans and Rita Wilson to release “PINK,” a new song about breast cancer.

“This is such a beautiful song of hope,” Parton said in a press release. “I’m honored to join with these powerful women to help support Susan G. Komen’s life-saving work.”

Parton Tweets Support

Susan G. Komen is a national nonprofit that funds breast cancer research, advocacy and educational efforts. It has the most funding of any breast cancer organization in the U.S. 

The song is available on the Komen Blog, where the proceeds from each play, stream or download go to fight breast cancer.

Parton also promoted the song on her Twitter account, tweeting a reminder that it’s Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

Victoria Shaw, the songwriter and producer responsible for the Garth Brooks hit “The River,” co-wrote and produced the song, ET Canada reported. 

The opportunity to help out left fellow country music singer Sara Evans feeling delighted, she said.

“After performing at the Opry Goes Pink last year, I’m thrilled to be supporting Susan G. Komen again this year in a very big way,” Evans said. “There is something magical that happens when women band together to have a positive impact on the world for our sisters and our daughters.”

A Deadly Disease

Susan G. Komen CEO Paula Schneider cheered the news of the song’s release.

“In a single moment, a person’s life changes forever – there is life before breast cancer, and life after,” said Schneider, a breast cancer survivor. “We are extremely honored that these powerful women have lent their time and talents to help us advance our mission and give a moment of hope to everyone impacted by breast cancer. Together, we will save lives and get closer to a world without breast cancer.”

Breast cancer kills more than 42,000 people every year. One in eight women gets diagnosed with breast cancer at some point in their lifetime.

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