Watch Duck Dynasty’s Phil Robertson Make His College Football Debut in 1965

by Outsider
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It turns out Duck Dynasty’s outspoken (and Unashamed) Phil Robertson is a football star. At least, he was when he made his debut on the field back in 1965.

A new clip provided by Rice Athletics is available online that showed off exactly how proficient Robertson was with a pigskin at the time.

According to the YouTube description, Robertson played as a quarterback at Louisiana Tech from 1965 to 1967. When he entered college, he started playing at Houston’s Rice Stadium in 1965. The Rice Athletics department opted to post this stream of the original broadcast from Robertson’s storied history.

There’s no audio of Robertson hitting the field. But this classic footage is more than enough to analyze for big fans of the game. As many Duck Dynasty fans will tell you), Robertson can definitely still throw a pass.

“It looked good for an old guy,” user Mike Patton said of the time. “Good techniques.”

Phil Robertson previously played football alongside Terry Bradshaw

Previously, Robertson actually played alongside Hall-of-Famer Terry Bradshaw in college. Robertson had “as quick a release as Joe Namath,” according to Bradshaw. The superstar player ended up as a back-up quarterback to Robertson for two entire years. Eventually, Bradshaw took over when Robertson decided to quit.

“He knew his passion was duck hunting, and he knew my passion was football,” Bradshaw said. Robertson cutting his football career short was mostly about following his heart.

Even during practice, Robertson would “come in with fish guts and junk,” Bradshaw said. But if it weren’t for the intense love for nature and fishing, Robertson could definitely have flourished at football. Bradshaw believes he could even have made the NFL.

Things didn’t work out that way of course, but this is a lesson in what can happen when you follow our greatest passions. Robertson ended up an integral part of the Duck Dynasty legacy. The rest, as they say, is history.

Outsider.com