‘Dukes of Hazzard’ Star John Schneider’s Louisiana Home, Studio Damaged By Hurricane Ida

by Lauren Boisvert
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Hurricane Ida ripped through Louisiana and Mississippi over the weekend, causing severe flooding and power outages across the states. The category 4 storm made landfall in Louisiana on the 16th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina. Additionally, officials downgraded it to a Tropical Depression as it moved Northward across Mississippi.

John Schneider, best known for playing Bo Duke on Dukes of Hazzard, tweeted recently about the damage hurricane Ida inflicted on his Holden, Louisiana home and studio. A friend of Schneider’s posted a photo of the damage; most notably, there are many uprooted trees around the property, one visibly crushing a replica of the General Lee.

Schneider was in Nashville helping to organize the Middle Tennessee flood relief efforts; he made his way back to Louisiana to check on his property, according to Fox News.

In response, he Tweeted, “We are headed back and seem to be the only ones on the road. I’m [sic] get a real look at the damage to mom’s house in the morning and then head back to TN to continue flood relief.” He let friends and fans know that “All people and pups are good.”

Updates From Louisiana and Mississippi

According to AP News, officials reported “catastrophic” power grid damage; it “could be weeks before the power grid is repaired”. More than 1 million properties in Louisiana and Mississippi, which included “all of New Orleans,” were left without power. Currently, two deaths have been reportedly caused by hurricane Ida, but with the extent of the power outages and damage, a spokesperson for Governor John Bel Edwards said, “We’re going to have many more confirmed fatalities.”

Additionally, state and federal rescuers have currently saved 671 people from flooding in a “near-constant operation” following hurricane Ida. As for the people who were able to evacuate, the Louisiana governor’s office reported that over 2,200 people were staying in 41 shelters; officials expect a rising number as FEMA and the National Guard bring in more rescued people. According to AP, “the state will work to move people to hotels as soon as possible so they can keep their distance from one another”. The governor’s spokesperson stated, “We do anticipate that we could see some COVID spikes related to this.”

Details on Hurricane Ida

According to The Indian Express, Ida hit with 150 mph winds; this tied it with last year’s hurricane Laura for 5th most intense storm in the U.S., based on wind speed. Ida started out with 85 mph winds before landfall, but gained 35 mph 24 hours before landfall; this tied Ida with 2007’s hurricane Humberto for “most rapid intensification in the day before landfall.”

Currently, officials are unsure how much hurricane Ida will cost; the most expensive storms in the U.S. rank at 2005’s Katrina, 2017’s Harvey, 2017’s Maria, 2012’s Sandy, and 2017’s Irma.

Outsider.com