Elvis Presley’s Custom Pants Hit Auction Site with Starting Bid of $300

by Matthew Wilson
Elvis-Presleys-Custom-Pants-Hit-Auction-Site-Starting-Bid-300

A lucky bidder could be walking in style like Elvis Presley. An auction house is reportedly auctioning off a pair of the King of Rock n’ Roll’s pants. The starting bid is only $300.

Unfortunately, the pants aren’t one of Presley’s more outlandish pieces of clothing. Potential buyers won’t find rhinestones or any of the exaggerated swagger that made up the later part of Presley’s career. Instead, the pants are a plain navy blue and potentially from early in his career.

Auction house Lelands is selling the historical piece of memorabilia. Five people have bid on the item so far. Currently, someone has bid $531 with 19 days left before the online auction ends.

“The King is gone but never forgotten,” the auction house wrote on its website. “Pair of dress pants belonging to the great Elvis Presley has ‘Name: E. Presley, MGM’ stamped inside flap and no maker tag inside.”

Elvis Presley’s Father Donated the Pants

It is unknown if the clothing item comes with a letter of authenticity or if it was verified independently. Apparently, the pants will also come with a letter from Presley’s father, Vernon to confirm its legitimacy. Vernon donated the pants to the Salvation Army before his death in 1979.

“These blue pants come with a typed and signed letter by Vernon Presley (Elvis’ Father) stating ‘I Vernon Presley donate this pair of blue pants owned and worn by my son Elvis Presley.’ Not exactly Blue Suede Shoes, but a classic item nonetheless,” the auction house wrote.

Auctions for celebrity memorabilia, Presley included, aren’t anything new. Recently, a British man auctioned off a piece of Presley’s hair for the grand sum of around $5000, according to BBC. Additionally, several country music artists auctioned off their CMA attire and memorabilia for COVID-19 relief. One lucky sports card collector also plans to auction off a one-of-a-kind Lebron James card for potentially hundreds of thousands.

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