‘Fixer Upper’ Star Chip Gaines’ Advice to ‘Transform’ a Single Living Room Wall

by Suzanne Halliburton
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Want to do something with your boring living room? Fixer Upper star Chip Gaines has a simple trick.

Don’t tear down any walls or buy expensive furniture. There’s no need to find some new art. Rather, it’s about all about a brush and a bucket.

“If you’re looking for a simple, cost-effective way to transform a single wall in your living room,” the Fixer Upper star said. “A fresh coat of paint is the way to go. If what you’re looking for is a more dramatic upgrade, built-in cabinets or shelving are both good options. They add a ton of character to a room, plus they’re great for storage.”

Gaines gave this terrific advice to the Sarah Joy blog. She sent a photo of one of her living room walls and asked the Fixer Upper star for what he’d do to give the wall an update. Coincidentally, the blogger already seemed to be a big fan of the Fixer Upper farmhouse chic aesthetic. The room featured a light brown wood floor. The wall was a different shade of brown. There was weathered clock hanging near a storage unit that also doubled as a TV stand. A sign saying “our nest” was above the TV and in between two wall sconces.

Chip and Joanna Gaines Live for Fixer Upper Hacks

Chip and Joanna Gaines live for this stuff. Back in 2013, the married couple started Fixer Upper for HGTV. It was a tried and true concept, but from a different angle. The Gaines helped people choose an older home to redecorate. But all the houses were in Waco, a Central Texas community halfway between Dallas and Austin. All the homes were affordable, leaving a big chunk for the decorating budget.

Chip’s contractor crew did the renovation. Joanna would take over and redecorate. The couple earned $500,000 a year in the early seasons of Fixer Upper. The show was an HGTV fixture for five years. But the couple ended it in 2018.

Joanna Gaines, in an interview with Oprah Winfrey, said the couple started losing “steam” for the show.

“On my side it was, when you’re filming for four or five years, you begin to lose the ‘why,’” said Joanna Gaines, a mother of five. “It’s now just this thing of like we’re just showing up. I think towards the end we just lost steam, we lost the purpose of it.”

“We wanted to wake up every day and say this is why we’re doing this,” she added. “It almost felt like it was wagging our tail and it was controlling us.”

Now, the Gaines and Fixer Upper are reinvigorated. It could be a billon-dollar brand. They launched Magnolia Network last month in a partnership with Discovery+. Of course, a revamped Fixer Upper is the centerpiece of the programming that also can be viewed on the Magnolia app. It’ll all move to cable TV in January.

Outsider.com